Planet Hunters Report Record-Breaking Discovery, Search for other habitable planets

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Profile LynnProject Donor
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Message 1587468 - Posted: 15 Oct 2014, 23:06:51 UTC - in response to Message 1584203.  

No Joke: Astronomers Say Alien Planet Resembles Uranus

Let the grade-school jokes begin: Astronomers say they have detected the first known Uranus-like planet circling an alien star. The exoplanet is part of a double-star system that's 25,000 light-years from Earth, known as OGLE-2008-BLG-092L. Its presence was detected using a method known as microlensing, which takes advantage of the light-bending effect of massive stars to magnify faraway objects.

The newfound planet, reported by Ohio State University's Radek Poleski and his colleagues, is four times as massive as Uranus (heh, heh), and orbits at a similar distance (about 19 times farther away from its primary parent star than Earth is from the sun). Planets with masses in that range have been detected before, but not that far out. Ohio State's Andrew Gould, a co-author of the research paper appearing online in The Astrophysical Journal, said in a news release that the alien Uranus may help explain how our own solar system's ice giants ended up where they are:

Let the grade-school jokes begin: Astronomers say they have detected the first known Uranus-like planet circling an alien star. The exoplanet is part of a double-star system that's 25,000 light-years from Earth, known as OGLE-2008-BLG-092L. Its presence was detected using a method known as microlensing, which takes advantage of the light-bending effect of massive stars to magnify faraway objects.

The newfound planet, reported by Ohio State University's Radek Poleski and his colleagues, is four times as massive as Uranus (heh, heh), and orbits at a similar distance (about 19 times farther away from its primary parent star than Earth is from the sun). Planets with masses in that range have been detected before, but not that far out. Ohio State's Andrew Gould, a co-author of the research paper appearing online in The Astrophysical Journal, said in a news release that the alien Uranus may help explain how our own solar system's ice giants ended up where they are:

http://www.nbcnews.com/science/weird-science/no-joke-astronomers-say-alien-planet-resembles-uranus-n226576
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Message 1587487 - Posted: 15 Oct 2014, 23:35:52 UTC

It amazes me that they are able to make such determinations at that distance.
Bob DeWoody

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Message 1587883 - Posted: 16 Oct 2014, 17:28:09 UTC - in response to Message 1587487.  
Last modified: 16 Oct 2014, 17:30:54 UTC

It amazes me that they are able to make such determinations at that distance.


I know what you mean Bob - even though it's four times bigger than... erm... [insert]our[/insert] ... Uranus :) it still boggles my brain.
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Message 1587900 - Posted: 16 Oct 2014, 18:08:11 UTC - in response to Message 1587487.  

It amazes me that they are able to make such determinations at that distance.


+1 Thanx for the post Lynn:)
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Message 1608911 - Posted: 4 Dec 2014, 1:27:16 UTC - in response to Message 1587900.  

Are astronomers being fooled by 'mirage Earths'? Planets orbiting dwarf stars look habitable from afar but are actually barren

Recently, scientists have postulated that the most abundant stars in our galaxy, red dwarfs, despite being no more than 20 per cent the mass of the sun, might be able to host habitable planets.

But a new study has warned that any 'Earth-like' worlds we spot in the habitable zone of these stars will be nothing more than an illusion – owing to the intense radiation they receive early in their life.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2859376/Are-astronomers-fooled-mirage-Earths-Planets-orbiting-dwarf-stars-look-habitable-afar-actually-barren.html
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Message 1608918 - Posted: 4 Dec 2014, 2:05:31 UTC - in response to Message 1384789.  

+1
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Message 1609000 - Posted: 4 Dec 2014, 8:27:53 UTC - in response to Message 1433999.  

I believe that they are plentiful in the Universe. But per Galaxy--maybe only a very few. As we develop the means to look out to say 1000 light years we can test this. If we can measure things like atmosphere composition, ground temperature, orbit eccentricity, magnetic field, ozone presence, water and land mixture, stable spin and so on then we will know more.

Assuming that we are doing a proper job of listening via SETI--we should have heard anyone out to maybe 100 light years and more by now. Thus we may conclude that if there are "Habitable" planets out at these distances, then the inhabitants have not progressed to the point of having developed electronics a few hundred years ago.

Adding:
and we are doing some 100y of radio transmission on Earth...so anyone around 50ly radius would respond by now (if he wanted)! ;)

So, I agree with you! Not so much inteligence around...or they are SHY!

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Message 1609336 - Posted: 5 Dec 2014, 5:00:19 UTC - in response to Message 1609000.  


...

and we are doing some 100y of radio transmission on Earth...so anyone around 50ly radius would respond by now (if he wanted)! ;)

So, I agree with you! Not so much inteligence around...or they are SHY!

It is likely the television and radio signals we have been sending out into space are too weak to distinguish from background noise at interstellar distances.
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Message 1609362 - Posted: 5 Dec 2014, 6:47:04 UTC - in response to Message 1609336.  


...

and we are doing some 100y of radio transmission on Earth...so anyone around 50ly radius would respond by now (if he wanted)! ;)

So, I agree with you! Not so much inteligence around...or they are SHY!

It is likely the television and radio signals we have been sending out into space are too weak to distinguish from background noise at interstellar distances.

if that was the case, SETI@home would not exist...and it does!
also: http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily-lakdawalla/2012/3390.html

so far noone has been calculating how far the signals from Earth would go to Space...as the emitters got more and more powerful from 1890 on...

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Message 1609477 - Posted: 5 Dec 2014, 14:31:32 UTC - in response to Message 1609362.  

so far noone has been calculating how far the signals from Earth would go to Space...as the emitters got more and more powerful from 1890 on...

Recently emitters have been getting less and less powerful as the spectrum has become more and more crowded.
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Message 1609519 - Posted: 5 Dec 2014, 17:12:45 UTC - in response to Message 1609362.  


...

and we are doing some 100y of radio transmission on Earth...so anyone around 50ly radius would respond by now (if he wanted)! ;)

So, I agree with you! Not so much inteligence around...or they are SHY!

It is likely the television and radio signals we have been sending out into space are too weak to distinguish from background noise at interstellar distances.

if that was the case, SETI@home would not exist...and it does!
also: http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily-lakdawalla/2012/3390.html

so far noone has been calculating how far the signals from Earth would go to Space...as the emitters got more and more powerful from 1890 on...


Here is a quote from a website about how far signals have gotten from us.

"Because of this inverse square law, all of our terrestrial radio signals become indistinguishable from background noise at around a few light-years from earth. For a civilization only a couple hundred light-years away, trying to listen to our broadcasts would be like trying to detect the small ripple from a pebble dropped in the pacific ocean off the coast of California – from Japan."

http://zidbits.com/2011/07/how-far-have-radio-signals-traveled-from-earth/
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Message 1610674 - Posted: 8 Dec 2014, 6:33:54 UTC - in response to Message 1609477.  

so far noone has been calculating how far the signals from Earth would go to Space...as the emitters got more and more powerful from 1890 on...

Recently emitters have been getting less and less powerful as the spectrum has become more and more crowded.

Yes...and most of the DATA goes underground to cables... :/
We might think of ourselves as advanced...having short range BT & WiFi...but can some ET hear us?

How come nobody thought about comare signal from Earth against backround noise...and see how far can Earth be detected... ;)

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Message 1610675 - Posted: 8 Dec 2014, 6:37:33 UTC - in response to Message 1609519.  


...

and we are doing some 100y of radio transmission on Earth...so anyone around 50ly radius would respond by now (if he wanted)! ;)

So, I agree with you! Not so much inteligence around...or they are SHY!

It is likely the television and radio signals we have been sending out into space are too weak to distinguish from background noise at interstellar distances.

if that was the case, SETI@home would not exist...and it does!
also: http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily-lakdawalla/2012/3390.html

so far noone has been calculating how far the signals from Earth would go to Space...as the emitters got more and more powerful from 1890 on...


Here is a quote from a website about how far signals have gotten from us.

"Because of this inverse square law, all of our terrestrial radio signals become indistinguishable from background noise at around a few light-years from earth. For a civilization only a couple hundred light-years away, trying to listen to our broadcasts would be like trying to detect the small ripple from a pebble dropped in the pacific ocean off the coast of California – from Japan."

http://zidbits.com/2011/07/how-far-have-radio-signals-traveled-from-earth/

Nice...so back to SETI - how do we think we can detect some signal from outher space, houndreds or even millions of ly away? :/

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Message 1610814 - Posted: 8 Dec 2014, 14:24:39 UTC - in response to Message 1610675.  
Last modified: 8 Dec 2014, 14:27:47 UTC

how do we think we can detect some signal from outher space


Many of us believe, since we have been listening for 50 years now, that only a very high powered, intentionally focused beacon (laser or microwave) type of signal could be detected. Since THEY would not know that we are here, this would likely be a slewing type of transmission and would likely not be a constant signal burt rather a one-time event.

As far as I know, we are not transmitting such a message. Let's hope that: if another civilization exists, that they are not as ignorant as we are in this regard.
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Message 1610860 - Posted: 8 Dec 2014, 16:33:53 UTC

Assuming there are space faring civilizations in our portion of the Milky Way we will most likely be found purely by chance and the same goes the other way. We might be looking for a very long time or we may make contact tomorrow.
Bob DeWoody

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Message 1611181 - Posted: 9 Dec 2014, 7:00:26 UTC - in response to Message 1610860.  

Assuming there are space faring civilizations in our portion of the Milky Way we will most likely be found purely by chance and the same goes the other way. We might be looking for a very long time or we may make contact tomorrow.

Or maybe comnbination of Arecibo with software could find even faint signal...so to rephrase question: how faint signal can we detect with this software? ;)

In other words...how FAR can we "hear someone fart"? :D

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Message 1611230 - Posted: 9 Dec 2014, 9:26:01 UTC

We might be looking for a very long time or we may make contact tomorrow.

But as I've said before Bob, I personally think it's unlikely that the likes of us will get to know about it if we did. Seti has always stated that if they find a repeatable WOW signal, then it will be circulated first within the scientific community for verification. At that point it would be hard to supress it, and it is very likely that the security services would issue a blanket clamp down and declare it top secret. If we did discover ET and could reverse engineer their likely technology, then whoever was first, USA, Russia, China, etc would rule the world.

Should we stop looking? HELL NO!!!
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Message 1611339 - Posted: 9 Dec 2014, 15:48:49 UTC - in response to Message 1611230.  
Last modified: 9 Dec 2014, 15:51:06 UTC

Assuming that there are OTHERS to find us out there in our Galaxy and beyond; we won't be found since we are not broadcasting any powerful, focused blasts out into the cosmos.

If They were close enough to pick up our radar or TV broadcasts, we would have heard them by now ourselves.

I don't think that any legitimate contact would, could or should be kept secret.
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Message 1611590 - Posted: 10 Dec 2014, 7:05:42 UTC
Last modified: 10 Dec 2014, 7:06:22 UTC

Assuming that there are OTHERS to find us out there in our Galaxy and beyond; we won't be found since we are not broadcasting any powerful, focused blasts out into the cosmos.


Well, we are...talking to our probes near Jupiter, Saturn, Pluto & Mars...

The question is: if we beam our data to those probes...and those are powerfull beams enough to get to those probes...so they would reach probably further than several ly (5-10ly is what radio emissions are heared)...
So to what systems that lay beyond our probes did we send data? And which data?
Are there any SETI candicates (that we know of) beyond our probes?
How much would the signal reach if we talk to Voyager 1 or 2? Rosseta? MAVEN & the rovers on Mars?

List of missions:
http://science.nasa.gov/missions/
http://www.esa.int/ESA/Our_Missions , http://sci.esa.int/home/51459-missions/
...

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Message 1611767 - Posted: 10 Dec 2014, 15:18:45 UTC - in response to Message 1611590.  
Last modified: 10 Dec 2014, 15:19:09 UTC

The Voyager space craft is only 13 billion miles from earth and will take another 300 years to reach the Oort cloud which is the outer limit of our Solar system.

The nearest star system is about 4 light-years away or about 20 Trillion miles.

We could probably detect TV and Radar at these distances --but for the past 50 years we haven't heard a thing as far as we know. It could also be that we did hear them but never had the smarts to decode their transmission--this is not likely in my opinion.
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Message boards : SETI@home Science : Planet Hunters Report Record-Breaking Discovery, Search for other habitable planets


 
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