Origin of life?


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Larry Monske
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Message 1379986 - Posted: 11 Jun 2013, 19:24:33 UTC

The early earth was molten rock no atmosphere no oceans and sterile. But in a billion years oceans developed. The one and absolutely the only place life could come from is space.Example; grasses either starts as a seed or rhizomes the living plant. It did not come from the ocean and are much older than any other land based plants. Another is flowering plants my example would be tuberious plants such as dahlias they are picky where they grow in all 6 temperate zones. How did the get to every continent grom desert to forested areas.They are ancient flowers.Just how do they circumvent the planet.Which came first chicken or the egg? Basic one celled animal that homosapians are confused with. The one celled animals from the seas are still as they were for eons.Humans dont seem to be a part of nature like other prehistoric life. Our closest reletives cro- magnan and neanderthals existed side by side and endured a 100000 years of an ice age and go extinct...
Modern man the builder became the dominant species too fast for evolution to explain. In the last 14,000 years man has went from caves to space a very fast paced evolution or is it?

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Message 1380015 - Posted: 11 Jun 2013, 20:27:54 UTC

Reading between the lines here, are you suggesting that there was some sort of intelligent outside influence in mans background? If so, I think we know where we are going here ...

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Message 1385365 - Posted: 28 Jun 2013, 12:19:50 UTC - in response to Message 1379986.
Last modified: 28 Jun 2013, 12:20:23 UTC

The one and absolutely the only place life could come from is space.


I'm not a campaigner for the panspermia hypothesis. you can compare the early earh with a chemical laboratory. Everything life is made of you can find here.
Asteroids maybe brought some building blocks (and also nearly the whole H2O) for the first autoreplicating polymeric moleculs (maybe RNA, PNA (peptide nucleic acid), prebiotic proteins eg..). :-)

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Message 1387289 - Posted: 3 Jul 2013, 17:38:12 UTC - in response to Message 1385365.

In early earth was sterile as could be as for us to bederived from slime of the sea do not compute because sea slime is still sea slime.As for homonoids apes appear as apes today as they did a million years ago. In the last 14000 years man became from a hunter gather for 2 million years then lo and behold modern man that we know in the last 14000 years has went from caves to the moon. Early Homonoid were a part of the earth that blended well with the evironment for 2 million years or more. Now modern man once had cro-magnon and neanderthal to live with side by side why did they go extinct they lived though 100000 years of ice age. Modern man the builder takes hold toofast for evolution to explain.
why this dont make sense ancient humans took 2 million years and cro-magnon man, neanderthals the genectics are same as our with brains as big as ours. They went extinct with no real trace of their origins. In the genome project 5 destinct races. 1 in 500 people in europe could be directly related to Ghengas Kahn. Humans had their origen in south africa and in 2 million years migrated around the world.

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Message 1387374 - Posted: 3 Jul 2013, 20:06:30 UTC - in response to Message 1387289.

you are kinda mixing things up and no Ghenis Khan is potentially related to 1 in 500 people in Asia including Russia, Poland and all points east. Seems he like to breed himself into the local populations he'd conquered. This was discovered by examining the DNA from 10,000+ men from all over asia. A specific and unusual marker was found in an unusually large segment of the population. The only reasonable explanation was the Great Khan.



Lack of imagination about lifes origins is not a valid scientific reason to not to understand that we are related, even just a little bit, to every life form on this planet.
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Message 1392104 - Posted: 18 Jul 2013, 17:59:03 UTC

Problem with the 'life here began out there' theory is it adds another layer of complexity to the story. If life came from elsewhere then it must have evolved on some distant planet not unlike Earth and then found some means of travelling here. You haven't really gotten rid of the problem of how inorganic chemicals became organic and gave rise to life, you've only shifted the problem to some distant world. Seems to me that life evolving here as most of the data would suggest is the simpler solution.

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Message 1392848 - Posted: 20 Jul 2013, 14:14:15 UTC

If life could have only come from "out there"... then how did it first get started where it came from?

At SOME point life had to start SOMEWHERE in the galaxy. Why, with the huge diversity of life on our own planet, is it so hard to believe it started here?

And IF life can spontaneously start at some point in time on this planet, why would it be so hard to believe that the same thing doesn't happen fairly frequently on planets throughout the galaxy?

Does it frequently evolve to intelligent life? Who knows... that depends on how you define "intelligent" life for one thing. (Would you consider a chimp to be intelligent?) Perhaps the galaxy is full of intelligent beings that have much better communication technology than we have. Why don't we hear their radio signals? Perhaps they have found much more efficient ways to communicate than using radio signals. If they've moved beyond using simple radio signals is it any wonder why we don't hear from them (and vice versa)?
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Message 1393443 - Posted: 22 Jul 2013, 1:56:04 UTC

Even though biological scientists are tantalizingly close, none that I have heard of have crossed the threshold of actually sparking organic material into forming a new living creature. Thus the last stronghold of believers in a higher power.
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Message 1393468 - Posted: 22 Jul 2013, 4:08:06 UTC

"What is life?" By Erwin Schroedinger (1948) is still worth reading. The Schroedinger equation is still the basic equation of structural chemistry.
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Message 1393497 - Posted: 22 Jul 2013, 6:28:12 UTC

At SOME point life had to start SOMEWHERE in the galaxy

If the universe is infinite and has always been there, then life has always been there. Our local part of the universe which we observe, is the remnants of the big bang about 13 billion years ago, and our local galaxy the Milky Way was formed a few million years afterwards, and our solar system is part of the Orion Arm at 4.5 billion years old.

The point is that we are here, so life began at some point in the last 13 billion years, whether there is other life in our galaxy, in other galaxies, or elsewhere in the as yet unobservable universe that our big bang is expanding into, we shall never know. We may be a one off, it may be teeming out there.

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Message 1393894 - Posted: 23 Jul 2013, 9:46:59 UTC - in response to Message 1393497.

If there were, say, a half dozen habitable planets that spawned intelligent life in our galaxy, then there would be hundreds of billions intelligent civilizations in the universe. However, at this density we will never be able to verify whether or not this is true.

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Message 1408826 - Posted: 28 Aug 2013, 14:01:55 UTC - in response to Message 1393894.

If there were, say, a half dozen habitable planets that spawned intelligent life in our galaxy, then there would be hundreds of billions intelligent civilizations in the universe. However, at this density we will never be able to verify whether or not this is true.



Except if we intercept a (radio) signal...
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Message 1408843 - Posted: 28 Aug 2013, 14:51:08 UTC

All radio signals we get come from the past. I wonder if there is a method to know how long ago every signal was emitted. The weaker the signal the longer the distance and therefore the earlier the moment of emission. We are seeing only the past of the Universe.
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Message 1408853 - Posted: 28 Aug 2013, 15:40:43 UTC - in response to Message 1408843.

All radio signals we get come from the past. I wonder if there is a method to know how long ago every signal was emitted. The weaker the signal the longer the distance and therefore the earlier the moment of emission. We are seeing only the past of the Universe.
Tullio



So sad but true...If we intercept any signal, we will never know whether that civilization still exists...
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Message 1408907 - Posted: 28 Aug 2013, 17:24:20 UTC

Julie makes a practical point. However,if we intercepted any signal from anywhere, although we would not know if the senders were still alive, it would give us hope that there might be others out here apart from them.

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Message 1408963 - Posted: 28 Aug 2013, 19:35:52 UTC - in response to Message 1408907.

Julie makes a practical point. However,if we intercepted any signal from anywhere, although we would not know if the senders were still alive, it would give us hope that there might be others out here apart from them.



So true...
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Message 1408998 - Posted: 28 Aug 2013, 20:33:42 UTC
Last modified: 28 Aug 2013, 20:38:09 UTC

Have you ever wondered about the creation of our own world and its existence and presence in space.

Without our sun, as well as atmosphere and water, life would never have been able to exist and survive on this earth.

Volcanoes, earthquakes and tsunamis both creates and destroys. The extinction of the dinosaurs by an asteroid impact some 65 million years ago created a new chapter in the history of the evolution of the earth.

Did the surviving mammals, birds, apes and other perhaps smaller reptilian animals which survived this disaster ever say "Thanks, now they are gone!" (meaning the dinosaurs)?

Same goes for the current knowledge about our current position and place in the Milky Way. The Universe is consisting of millions or more individual galaxies as well as galaxy clusters. All this stuff was never meant for us alone.

The only way we can assume that we are not alone in the Universe is either being able to deduce or conclude that alien visitors have been visiting earth in the past or that someday an intelligent signal will be picked up showing us that we really are not the only intelligent species inhabiting the Universe (or Milky Way for that matter).

Then the question becomes - would the detection of an intelligent signal tell us anything about biology and possible other social characteristics (including behaviour and reproduction) which may be present among possible alien beings?

Perhaps not so. If it ever happened, we would only be able to catch the signal itself, probably nothing more.

At least it would be logical to assume that they in fact are intelligent in nature if they really do exist at all.

We apparently still are awaiting the day it may happen - meaning the positive detection of an intelligent signal.

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Message 1409008 - Posted: 28 Aug 2013, 20:55:44 UTC

We only know things for sure that are scientifically proven. If you want to go further than that maybe you have to expand your mind, I don't know...The point is, there's so little that we know. Science has helped us a lot already for understanding things luckily.
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Message 1409111 - Posted: 29 Aug 2013, 1:41:50 UTC

There is a flurry of activity in theoretical physics and astrophysics about the universe and its origin. There is an article in the 29 August issue of "Nature" magazine summarizing this activity titled "The origins of space and time". The idea I understand more is that of the Universe as a hologram (Juan Maldacena, 1998).
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Message 1409184 - Posted: 29 Aug 2013, 5:44:33 UTC - in response to Message 1409111.

There is a flurry of activity in theoretical physics and astrophysics about the universe and its origin. There is an article in the 29 August issue of "Nature" magazine summarizing this activity titled "The origins of space and time". The idea I understand more is that of the Universe as a hologram (Juan Maldacena, 1998).
Tullio

Here's a link to the article in Nature.
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