International Law

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Profile Sarge
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Message 1330542 - Posted: 24 Jan 2013, 0:13:20 UTC

Well, of course, in our dealing with other countries, and their people, our US Constitution should be the final word on the LAW. Right, it's obvious?

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Message 1330557 - Posted: 24 Jan 2013, 0:48:01 UTC - in response to Message 1330542.

When dealing with other countries, shouldn't International Law take precedence?


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Message 1330564 - Posted: 24 Jan 2013, 1:42:51 UTC

Would anyone understand the word--sovereignty?

Reading is downloading wetware for the mind.

We don't give up such things when dealing with other countries?

The U.N. should find another home.


Must not conflict resolve by suggesting that someone should go sit on an ice pick...

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Message 1330566 - Posted: 24 Jan 2013, 1:44:40 UTC

If an incident happened on US soil outside of a foreign embassy and the person doesn't have diplomatic privileges, American law should be used.




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Message 1330594 - Posted: 24 Jan 2013, 3:58:52 UTC
Last modified: 24 Jan 2013, 3:59:26 UTC

Hell no, lets have Sharia Law and stone them to death, diplomatic immunity or not. It's the law in half the world so it's international law too. A good old fashion stoning is in order.


Must not conflict resolve by suggesting that someone should go sit on an ice pick...

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Profile Gary CharpentierCrowdfunding Project Donor
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Message 1330601 - Posted: 24 Jan 2013, 4:34:27 UTC - in response to Message 1330566.

If an incident happened on US soil outside of a foreign embassy and the person doesn't have diplomatic privileges, American law should be used.

American or US Law still can be used if the person has diplomatic privileges as by treaty US law recognizes such privileges, just as it does the ICJ by treaty. Of course US law applies to US citizens everywhere.

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Message 1330607 - Posted: 24 Jan 2013, 4:52:27 UTC - in response to Message 1330601.

American or US Law still can be used if the person has diplomatic privileges as by treaty US law recognizes such privileges, just as it does the ICJ by treaty. Of course US law applies to US citizens everywhere.


No Gary if you are in a foreign country (w/ no diplo privileges) and you commit a crime, the foreign countrys' law takes precedence. You can go to a US Embassy for help but you are still bound by the foreign nation's laws.


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Message 1330610 - Posted: 24 Jan 2013, 4:58:21 UTC - in response to Message 1330601.

If an incident happened on US soil outside of a foreign embassy and the person doesn't have diplomatic privileges, American law should be used.

American or US Law still can be used if the person has diplomatic privileges as by treaty US law recognizes such privileges, just as it does the ICJ by treaty. Of course US law applies to US citizens everywhere.


You just really don't have any idea what you are talking about. Just make it up as you go along do ya?

We don't give up sovereignty--ever. If someone tell you you must they are guilty of treason. A unconstitutional law is NO law at all and will get no respect or will be treated as law.

The stoning argument still holds water if you wish for international law, if you're gay and come out with it, you will be stoned. If you cheat in a marriage the lady will be stoned. You cannot have it both ways. We either follow the rule of law within our borders or we accept international law and stone people. Make up your mind.
Must not conflict resolve by suggesting that someone should go sit on an ice pick...

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Profile Gary CharpentierCrowdfunding Project Donor
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Message 1330612 - Posted: 24 Jan 2013, 5:02:31 UTC - in response to Message 1330607.

American or US Law still can be used if the person has diplomatic privileges as by treaty US law recognizes such privileges, just as it does the ICJ by treaty. Of course US law applies to US citizens everywhere.


No Gary if you are in a foreign country (w/ no diplo privileges) and you commit a crime, the foreign countrys' law takes precedence. You can go to a US Embassy for help but you are still bound by the foreign nation's laws.

You misunderstand, if you are A US Citizen and in a foreign country and break US law, but not the foreign country's law, US law still applies. An well known example is the differing age of consent laws between the USA and other countries.

I wasn't trying to imply that a US citizen is not bound by the law where he is located, including at sea.

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Message 1330615 - Posted: 24 Jan 2013, 5:24:51 UTC - in response to Message 1330610.

If an incident happened on US soil outside of a foreign embassy and the person doesn't have diplomatic privileges, American law should be used.

American or US Law still can be used if the person has diplomatic privileges as by treaty US law recognizes such privileges, just as it does the ICJ by treaty. Of course US law applies to US citizens everywhere.


You just really don't have any idea what you are talking about. Just make it up as you go along do ya?


I suspect libertarian Gary knows precisely what he is talking about.

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Profile Gary CharpentierCrowdfunding Project Donor
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Message 1330619 - Posted: 24 Jan 2013, 5:33:43 UTC - in response to Message 1330615.

If an incident happened on US soil outside of a foreign embassy and the person doesn't have diplomatic privileges, American law should be used.

American or US Law still can be used if the person has diplomatic privileges as by treaty US law recognizes such privileges, just as it does the ICJ by treaty. Of course US law applies to US citizens everywhere.


You just really don't have any idea what you are talking about. Just make it up as you go along do ya?


I suspect libertarian Gary knows precisely what he is talking about.

I'm thinking ID denies Marbury v. Madison, 5 U.S. 137 (1803).

As to my example, could be I know a LEO who cuffed a perp.

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Message boards : Politics : International Law


 
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