A Lost Planet, Or A Small Star?

Message boards : Science (non-SETI) : A Lost Planet, Or A Small Star?

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Message 1306086 - Posted: 14 Nov 2012, 13:18:27 UTC
Last modified: 14 Nov 2012, 13:20:14 UTC

This is an interesting one:


'Rogue planet' spotted 100 light-years away

Astronomers have spotted a "rogue planet" - wandering the cosmos without a star to orbit - 100 light-years away. ...


So... 400 deg C on the 'surface' and wandering in line with a cluster of stars...

I'd put that in the category of a warm "Big Jupiter", perhaps still cooling down from coalescing.


I expect there are wandering free bodies such as comets, asteroids and planets, that have been ejected from their home star system. However, I don't see how we can see to find them with our present capabilities... They have no star to illuminate them!

Perhaps the SKA has a chance to see cold lost wandering planets at radio frequencies for their cool emissions? Or will they be far too cold and lost in the noise?


Keep searchin',
Martin


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Message 1306703 - Posted: 16 Nov 2012, 7:40:10 UTC - in response to Message 1306086.

This is an interesting one:


'Rogue planet' spotted 100 light-years away

Astronomers have spotted a "rogue planet" - wandering the cosmos without a star to orbit - 100 light-years away. ...


So... 400 deg C on the 'surface' and wandering in line with a cluster of stars...

I'd put that in the category of a warm "Big Jupiter", perhaps still cooling down from coalescing.


I expect there are wandering free bodies such as comets, asteroids and planets, that have been ejected from their home star system. However, I don't see how we can see to find them with our present capabilities... They have no star to illuminate them!

Perhaps the SKA has a chance to see cold lost wandering planets at radio frequencies for their cool emissions? Or will they be far too cold and lost in the noise?


Keep searchin',
Martin




Huge find! Looks like there are wandering nomads out there. First glance I thought they found the (hypothetical planet) Tyche.
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Profile Gary CharpentierCrowdfunding Project Donor
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Message 1306923 - Posted: 16 Nov 2012, 21:50:06 UTC

nibiru? ;)


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Message 1306959 - Posted: 16 Nov 2012, 23:35:04 UTC - in response to Message 1306923.

nibiru? ;)



Forgot about that one. :-)

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Message 1307017 - Posted: 17 Nov 2012, 5:20:35 UTC

Some astronomers are speculating that there may be more rogue planets in the galaxy than there are stars.


Bob DeWoody

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Message 1307041 - Posted: 17 Nov 2012, 6:52:57 UTC

cosmos 1999 ?


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Message 1307077 - Posted: 17 Nov 2012, 11:34:45 UTC - in response to Message 1307041.
Last modified: 17 Nov 2012, 11:36:32 UTC

cosmos 1999 ?

Quite possibly, except there would be many lifetimes and many generations for any inhabitants on a 'base' there before sweeping past any other star systems...

Sorry to kill that old TV series dead :-(


But yes, there must be many coalesced bodies of all sizes lost wandering alone and dark in the vastness of space. Including star systems except that we can see those.

Keep searchin',
Martin
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Message 1309336 - Posted: 23 Nov 2012, 18:24:52 UTC - in response to Message 1307017.

Some astronomers are speculating that there may be more rogue planets in the galaxy than there are stars.



http://news.cnet.com/8301-11386_3-57384799-76/nomad-planets-roam-milky-way-without-stars/

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Message boards : Science (non-SETI) : A Lost Planet, Or A Small Star?


 
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