Planet found orbiting nearby Alpha Centari B


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Message boards : Science (non-SETI) : Planet found orbiting nearby Alpha Centari B

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Profile Bob DeWoody
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Message 1296057 - Posted: 17 Oct 2012, 4:55:18 UTC

A group of astronomers claim to have detected an earth sized planet orbiting Alpha Centari B. If verified this would be the closest exo planet yet.
http://news.yahoo.com/earth-sized-planet-found-just-outside-solar-system-214232222.html
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Message 1296069 - Posted: 17 Oct 2012, 5:46:16 UTC - in response to Message 1296057.

Yes! They found a planet and it's real.

From the article Bob, found.

"If there are any inhabitants there, they're made of asbestos," joked Shostak.


Earth-sized planet found just outside solar system

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Message 1296081 - Posted: 17 Oct 2012, 6:35:33 UTC

But they also speculate that other cooler planets are probable in that system. As far as going there is concerned it still may as well be on the other side of the galaxy. But it's looking more like nearby stars have the right stuff for planet formation.
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Message 1296413 - Posted: 18 Oct 2012, 0:24:28 UTC - in response to Message 1296081.

But they also speculate that other cooler planets are probable in that system. As far as going there is concerned it still may as well be on the other side of the galaxy. But it's looking more like nearby stars have the right stuff for planet formation.


You have to use your imagination right now when it comes to the cosmos. If there is another planet like Earth with oceans, atmosphere, clouds it's either nearby or very far away. It does look promising but there is so much stuff out there it's incredibly hard to detect them, very fascinating news though.

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Message 1296432 - Posted: 18 Oct 2012, 1:15:37 UTC

Perhaps, that planet has a habitable zone between the hot/cold regions.
If checking the planet, someday, should reveal biological
traces in the atmosphere, that possibility might be strengthened.

jm

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Message 1296457 - Posted: 18 Oct 2012, 5:03:47 UTC

I remember not so long ago that it was considered practically impossible for a binary or trinary system to have planetary bodies and that little or no possibility was given for any of the Centari stars to have planets. How quickly things change when the right tools become available.
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Message 1296530 - Posted: 18 Oct 2012, 14:42:31 UTC
Last modified: 18 Oct 2012, 14:44:10 UTC

Dr. Shostak, at the SETI Institute, says they are considering scanning Alpha Centauri with the Allen Telescope Array. They have been looking at the planets turned up by the Kepler Space Telescope. These planets are at an average distance of about 2250 light years. A signal of the same intrinsic power from Alpha Centauri B would typically appear several hundred thousand times stronger than from one these more distant planets, due to the comparatively negligible distance of Alpha Centauri.
Alpha Centauri B has a metallicity 160 percent of the Sun, making the existence of additional rocky planets seem probable; perhaps one or more of them in the star's habitable zone. The Alpha Centauri system is thought to be be about 6 billion years old, apparently allowing sufficient time for intelligent life to develop.

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Message 1296700 - Posted: 18 Oct 2012, 21:22:48 UTC

No one caught my error, I see. The Allen Telescope array is too far North for Alpha Centauri to be visible to it. I assume that that Dr. Shostak meant that the SETI institute was considering using an appropriately placed radio telescope, low in the Northern hemisphere, or in the Southern hemisphere to examine Alpha Centauri.

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Message 1296710 - Posted: 18 Oct 2012, 21:36:44 UTC
Last modified: 18 Oct 2012, 21:40:23 UTC

Why not put a radio telescope in a rocket (or perhaps a space shuttle if this program ever should be running again) and send it up into space?

Have radio telescopes ever been brought up into orbit? Is a receiving dish necessary or needed for using or utilizing a radio telescope? You really do not need to have a 305 m dish like Arecibo in order to carry out such a task. A 10-20 m dish should very much suffice when used in space.

Still the received signals need to be transmitted back to earth for further analysis, since like the Arecibo telescope itself, you will need computers in order for the received information to be analyzed further.

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Message 1296832 - Posted: 19 Oct 2012, 7:47:33 UTC

The absolute best place to have a radio telescope in operation, from earth's point of view, is the far side of our moon. Virtually no chance of a stray signal from earth getting picked up. It sweeps the entire sky once every 28+ days. It would also be a great place for an optical telescope as there is no atmosphere to compensate for. But it doesn't look like trips back to the moon are likely anytime soon.
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Message 1296877 - Posted: 19 Oct 2012, 12:38:22 UTC - in response to Message 1296832.

The absolute best place to have a radio telescope in operation, from earth's point of view, is the far side of our moon. Virtually no chance of a stray signal from earth getting picked up. It sweeps the entire sky once every 28+ days. It would also be a great place for an optical telescope as there is no atmosphere to compensate for. But it doesn't look like trips back to the moon are likely anytime soon.

That's an old idea that keeps on popping up. Unfortunately, the moon would be a logistics nightmare. Also, electrostatic dust and extreme temperature swings are just two irksome problems...

Better and easier is put an array way out in orbit at one of the Lagrange points or even beyond.


Keep searchin',
Martin

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Message boards : Science (non-SETI) : Planet found orbiting nearby Alpha Centari B

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