Xeon Phi (aka Knights Corner, MIC)


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Message 1249935 - Posted: 22 Jun 2012, 13:34:05 UTC - in response to Message 1249851.
Last modified: 22 Jun 2012, 13:56:58 UTC

There was a software tool called Parallel Virtual Machine by the University of Tennessee which allowed this. Once I connected a Bull/Mips minicomputer and a SUN SparcStation using this tool.
Tullio

That sounds neat. I will have to see if I can get that to work on some of my machines in the lab.
Hopefully this is the software you were referring to? http://www.csm.ornl.gov/pvm/
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Message 1249939 - Posted: 22 Jun 2012, 13:51:14 UTC - in response to Message 1249935.

Yes. I was meaning it.
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Message 1250034 - Posted: 22 Jun 2012, 17:30:12 UTC

I tried PVM a long time ago. Back on Fedora 6 when it was the newest release. I had access to a computer lab of 30 identical P4 3.0 machines and was trying to get that all configured, but even with the documentation, couldn't figure it out.
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Message 1250041 - Posted: 22 Jun 2012, 17:36:25 UTC - in response to Message 1249935.

There was a software tool called Parallel Virtual Machine by the University of Tennessee which allowed this. Once I connected a Bull/Mips minicomputer and a SUN SparcStation using this tool.
Tullio

That sounds neat. I will have to see if I can get that to work on some of my machines in the lab.
Hopefully this is the software you were referring to? http://www.csm.ornl.gov/pvm/



What a neat little piece of software. This could be just what I was looking for to teach myself compiling in an educational manner. I think I'll hang on to this source. :-)
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Message 1250500 - Posted: 23 Jun 2012, 17:38:15 UTC

PVM, hehe i had to write program using it in the parallel programing class at univ. It worked :) Tried to run a program with 100 childs (that does nothing just hangs a few sec) on a dual Pentium Pro comp. It ran more than a half hour, and had 35 load :D
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Message 1252032 - Posted: 27 Jun 2012, 10:12:25 UTC

Intel Xeon Phi steals top HPC tenders, more SKUs to come

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Message 1252036 - Posted: 27 Jun 2012, 10:37:51 UTC
Last modified: 27 Jun 2012, 10:58:59 UTC

I got a question for you.

Several years ago, around 1994-1995, I was getting in touch with Unix System V when making my studies at a local technical school here in town.

There were budget constraints and there were only a few workstations that offered Unix, either by means of terminals which was remotely connected, or as complete workstations on their own.

For the special lab, we only were able to use worn 386-based PC's.

If you are an ordinary user and am using the console only (no graphics or multi-user/multi-tasking environment) and input the command sleep 30, the PC goes to sleep for that 30 seconds.

But replace the command with sleep 30 & instead, making it a background process. What happens then?

What if the environment is more advanced/sophisticated? How would this command appear as a running process?

Finally, if you are root or superuser on a system, what may happen if you try running this command either by means of the console or in a graphical multi-user/multi-tasking environment?

Possibly I am wrong here.

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Message 1252042 - Posted: 27 Jun 2012, 10:55:39 UTC - in response to Message 1252036.

I got a question for you.

Several years ago, around 1994-1995, I was getting in touch with Unix System V when making my studies at a local technical school here in town.

There were budget constraints and there were only a few workstations that offered Unix, either by means of terminals which was remotely connected, or as complete workstations on their own.

For the special lab, we only were able to used worn 386-based PC's.

If you are an ordinary user and am using the console only (no graphics or multi-user/multi-tasking environment) and input the command sleep 30, the PC goes to sleep for that 30 seconds.

But replace the command with sleep 30 & instead, making it a background process. What happens then?

What if the environment is more advanced/sophisticated? How would this command appear as a running process?

Finally, if you are root or superuser on a system, what may happen if you try running this command either by means of the console or in a graphical multi-user/multi-tasking environment?

Possibly I am wrong here.


Is someone testing AI software?

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Message 1252048 - Posted: 27 Jun 2012, 11:07:18 UTC - in response to Message 1252042.

I got a question for you.

Several years ago, around 1994-1995, I was getting in touch with Unix System V when making my studies at a local technical school here in town.

There were budget constraints and there were only a few workstations that offered Unix, either by means of terminals which was remotely connected, or as complete workstations on their own.

For the special lab, we only were able to used worn 386-based PC's.

If you are an ordinary user and am using the console only (no graphics or multi-user/multi-tasking environment) and input the command sleep 30, the PC goes to sleep for that 30 seconds.

But replace the command with sleep 30 & instead, making it a background process. What happens then?

What if the environment is more advanced/sophisticated? How would this command appear as a running process?

Finally, if you are root or superuser on a system, what may happen if you try running this command either by means of the console or in a graphical multi-user/multi-tasking environment?

Possibly I am wrong here.


Is someone testing AI software?

If wanting to test simple unix/linux command inputs like that the best way is to go ahead and do it, and see what happens :¬)

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Message 1252052 - Posted: 27 Jun 2012, 11:19:13 UTC - in response to Message 1252036.
Last modified: 27 Jun 2012, 11:31:37 UTC

If you are an ordinary user and am using the console only (no graphics or multi-user/multi-tasking environment) and input the command sleep 30, the PC goes to sleep for that 30 seconds.

Actually, "sleep" doesn't make PC go to sleep. It is simply a process that executes for the given time (while not cunsuming any CPU cycles), then exits. It is commonly used in scripts (without &) to add artificial delays.

But replace the command with sleep 30 & instead, making it a background process. What happens then?

It simply launches process in the background (that does absolutely nothing) where it exists for the given number of seconds then exits. If you use it in a script like this (with &) it of course doesn't add delay to a script, because the script will continue executing while sleep is executing in the background, detached from the parent process.
(Oh, and non-multitasking OS wouldn't support any kind of launching into background anyway, except specially programmed processes - like drivers/memory resident programs - like in DOS).

What if the environment is more advanced/sophisticated? How would this command appear as a running process?

It's a process like any other program, with its own PID (process ID) and name "sleep N" (N = seconds).

Finally, if you are root or superuser on a system, what may happen if you try running this command either by means of the console or in a graphical multi-user/multi-tasking environment?

Makes no difference. "sleep" process will simply exist under root credentials.
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Message 1252082 - Posted: 27 Jun 2012, 13:17:48 UTC - in response to Message 1252042.

I got a question for you.

Several years ago, around 1994-1995, I was getting in touch with Unix System V when making my studies at a local technical school here in town.

There were budget constraints and there were only a few workstations that offered Unix, either by means of terminals which was remotely connected, or as complete workstations on their own.

For the special lab, we only were able to used worn 386-based PC's.

If you are an ordinary user and am using the console only (no graphics or multi-user/multi-tasking environment) and input the command sleep 30, the PC goes to sleep for that 30 seconds.

But replace the command with sleep 30 & instead, making it a background process. What happens then?

What if the environment is more advanced/sophisticated? How would this command appear as a running process?

Finally, if you are root or superuser on a system, what may happen if you try running this command either by means of the console or in a graphical multi-user/multi-tasking environment?

Possibly I am wrong here.


Is someone testing AI software?

Google is actually. Google simulates the human brain with 1000 machines, 16000 cores and a love of cats
With compute cards maybe they could have cut that down to 250 machines.
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Message 1252090 - Posted: 27 Jun 2012, 13:48:02 UTC - in response to Message 1252082.
Last modified: 27 Jun 2012, 14:01:36 UTC

Yes. I am sure the kittyman will agree with you as well.

Oh, meant to say so in private.

Thanks for the link anyway.

BTW. The pages here are slow at loading right now.

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Message 1252149 - Posted: 27 Jun 2012, 17:13:43 UTC - in response to Message 1252048.
Last modified: 27 Jun 2012, 17:18:24 UTC

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Message 1252150 - Posted: 27 Jun 2012, 17:15:22 UTC - in response to Message 1252048.
Last modified: 27 Jun 2012, 17:16:34 UTC

If wanting to test simple unix/linux command inputs like that the best way is to go ahead and do it, and see what happens :¬)


yes, sure, as long as those inputs don't include "rm" or "rm -r"...

*recalls lessons learned the hard way*



And on that note: "sleep 30&" will only force that background process to sleep, nothing else will be affected. so "sleep 30&" does nothing. but "sleep 30; <some other command> &" will do something, in 30 seconds...
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Message 1252154 - Posted: 27 Jun 2012, 17:21:36 UTC
Last modified: 27 Jun 2012, 17:25:45 UTC

I think Intel has their work cut out for them...

They just better hope that they can peak their performance, and grow the technology fast enough and cheap enough to compete with everything else going on right now.



I think with more cores, more RAM, and reduced price, they'd get their share of the market, and fast.

But I think the cost of these things will be keeping them out of the home HP computing market.
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Message 1252187 - Posted: 27 Jun 2012, 17:59:45 UTC - in response to Message 1252154.

I am sure that some SETI@home volunteer will buy them just to show how good he is. See "The theory of the leisure class" by Thorstein Veblen. This he called "conspicuous consumption".
Tullio
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Message 1270187 - Posted: 11 Aug 2012, 0:09:48 UTC

Another Phi revision:

Intel Xeon Phi (B0 Stepping): The Knight in Shining Armor?

And some Quadro news that reveals a lot about the NVIDIA Tesla K20 card (aka GK110, aka Big Kepler, aka the-card-that-could-have-been-the-GTX-680-maybe)

NVIDIA Announces Kepler-Based Quadro K5000 & Second-Generation Maximus

NVIDIA Maximus Fuels Workstation Revolution With Kepler Architecture

Can the New Nvidia Quadro K5000 Become the Most Profitable Graphics Card?

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Message 1272912 - Posted: 19 Aug 2012, 12:35:14 UTC

Intel's "MIC" Xeon Phi die has 62 cores, and was aimed for clocks much higher than 1GHz to fight Nvidia GK110

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Message 1296516 - Posted: 18 Oct 2012, 13:55:02 UTC - in response to Message 1252042.

Nvidia's Top End Kepler Unveiled: Tesla K20 Comes with Disappointing Specs, Performance

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