Unusual pulsing signal on 14.320 MHz


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Message boards : Science (non-SETI) : Unusual pulsing signal on 14.320 MHz

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Message 1205163 - Posted: 12 Mar 2012, 14:43:05 UTC
Last modified: 12 Mar 2012, 14:47:32 UTC

Thanks for the feed back Michael, it was worth looking at I thought. So the mystery continues then. I'm beginning to think that it must be some sort of military thing which is not in the public domain. If it was extraterrestrial, I'm sure Government agencies and others would have picked it up before now.

Many years ago I used to be a CB'er (hangs head in shame ...) and if the "Skip" was running I used to be able to talk to guys in Eastern Europe from the UK. Any thoughts upon that?

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Message 1205267 - Posted: 12 Mar 2012, 21:52:03 UTC

I guess the Government already knows what we here at Seti@home is not supposed to know.

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Message 1205308 - Posted: 13 Mar 2012, 1:42:19 UTC - in response to Message 1205163.
Last modified: 13 Mar 2012, 1:56:00 UTC

Thanks for the feed back Michael, it was worth looking at I thought. So the mystery continues then. I'm beginning to think that it must be some sort of military thing which is not in the public domain. If it was extraterrestrial, I'm sure Government agencies and others would have picked it up before now.

Many years ago I used to be a CB'er (hangs head in shame ...) and if the "Skip" was running I used to be able to talk to guys in Eastern Europe from the UK. Any thoughts upon that?
I'm not advocating an extraterrestrial explanation for the signal, though I wouldn't entirely rule one out, as yet, either. If the authorities have detected this signal, would we have been told of it? They, too, might have no explanation for it, and be reluctant to admit this. The U. S. National Security Agency, which extensively monitors radio signals is notorious for not openly revealing what they know, or how they know it. &&& If the military wanted to prevent the public from knowing about a secret experiment, they could have done much better than to set up shop in the middle of a busy amateur radio band, filled with hams very sensitive to the issue of intruders. The military has access to a great many non-broadcast, non-amateur 'utility' frequencies. Still, the question: 'if this is an experiment, what does it appear that it they might be trying to accomplish, or demonstrate' ? is interesting it itself. &&& The signal is undoubtedly being refracted by the ionosphere. It fades in and out, and is only heard (so far at least) during hours when 20 meters is open to long distance propagation. The skip zone on 20 meters is currently about 500 miles. Assuming a conventional signal path, anyone who hears it can rule out a transmitter within that distance, unless it's very close; nearly line-of sight. Michael

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Message 1205345 - Posted: 13 Mar 2012, 4:29:25 UTC - in response to Message 1205308.

How about this for a WAG? A submarine surfacing daily for several hours sending out a beacon of some sort. I've never known subs to do that though, as they desire to keep their location private.

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Message 1205575 - Posted: 13 Mar 2012, 23:22:57 UTC - in response to Message 1205345.

How about this for a WAG? A submarine surfacing daily for several hours sending out a beacon of some sort. I've never known subs to do that though, as they desire to keep their location private.
I just don't see the need for the military to use an amateur radio frequency, and make themselves conspicuous. They have so many other less listened to frequencies to use. Any high frequency transmission would be a poor, and relatively non-secure substitute for other available options such as VHF, UHF or higher frequencies, often relayed via satellite. Michael

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Message 1205651 - Posted: 14 Mar 2012, 2:59:40 UTC - in response to Message 1205575.

lets not forget that Nuclear subs routinely never surface when on patrol. They use bouys to send transmissions to satellites etc.
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Message 1205913 - Posted: 14 Mar 2012, 21:02:03 UTC - in response to Message 1205651.

lets not forget that Nuclear subs routinely never surface when on patrol. They use bouys to send transmissions to satellites etc.



or ULF with a cable/wire laying on the ocean floor...


Lt

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Message 1205947 - Posted: 14 Mar 2012, 22:31:15 UTC

After not being heard for 8 days, the 14.320 Mhz signal was back today, from 21:35 Universal Time. I hear it as I type this. It retains the same pattern as before, groups of 37 pulses, the first group in one audio tone, then the second group in the other tone. Pulsates at the rate of 50 per minute (48 actual pulses per minute, due to slight pauses between groups.) The last pulse of each group of 37 is shortened. Each tone group takes 46 seconds to complete. The signal is fairly strong today; up to S. 5 (2 bars). Michael

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Message 1206013 - Posted: 15 Mar 2012, 3:05:52 UTC
Last modified: 15 Mar 2012, 3:06:08 UTC

37 you say? So,
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/37_(number)

or, more imporantly,
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/73_(number)

73 is a very special number in number theory. Is this significant? No idea. Good luck with your investigation.
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Message 1206311 - Posted: 15 Mar 2012, 23:01:49 UTC - in response to Message 1206013.
Last modified: 15 Mar 2012, 23:16:44 UTC

37 you say? So,
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/37_(number)

or, more imporantly,
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/73_(number)

73 is a very special number in number theory. Is this significant? No idea. Good luck with your investigation.
Thanks for that, James. I don't know the significance of there being 37 pulses in each group in the signal. There might be an implied connection of 37 to 73 in it, though. As I observed, the last pulse in each group is noticeably shortened. Perhaps this is meant to indicate the alternate reading of 36 & 1/2. Multiplied by 2, the number of different tone groups, this yields 73. I find it interesting that 37 is a figurate number, *both* a centered hexagon and (6-pointed) star. Incidentally, the signal can be heard again today, since 23:05 Universal time. I heard it start up very weakly. It has since been gaining strength. Michael

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Message 1206365 - Posted: 16 Mar 2012, 2:23:19 UTC - in response to Message 1206311.

For those of you hearing it, it would be helpful to know where you hear it from. Not asking for exact location. Something like "Northeast Florida" is what I mean.

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Message 1206393 - Posted: 16 Mar 2012, 3:59:05 UTC

I tried listening for on about an hour ago via globaltuners.com from Vero Beach, FL, Blount Hill, N.C. and one in Winsconsin. Nothing. Could be because of the antenna on those radios though.

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Message 1206598 - Posted: 16 Mar 2012, 15:00:26 UTC - in response to Message 1206393.
Last modified: 16 Mar 2012, 15:04:17 UTC

I tried listening for on about an hour ago via globaltuners.com from Vero Beach, FL, Blount Hill, N.C. and one in Winsconsin. Nothing. Could be because of the antenna on those radios though.
The signal not likely to have been audible as late as 03:00 UT, when you indicate you listened. Past experience indicates it can only be heard between 16 hours and 01 hours UT. This is 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., here in Northern California. &&& The signal is very erratic in nature, coming and going within the above hours with no discernible pattern. Reports of non-reception of the signal would need to be tied to successful reception of it elsewhere, at the very same time, in order to, perhaps, tell us something. The signal has been reported at points as widespread as Northern California, New England, Minnesota, and the Bahamas, so its range is extensive. &&& We can test the supposition that the signal is propagated along a normal path. A 20 meter signal can not normally be heard within about 500 miles of the transmitter, except for short range, line-of-sight, or near line-of-sight contacts. If enough reports of its reception, from various locations, can be collected, it might become possible to rule out any transmitter location within the area the signal has been heard. This would raise some interesting questions. Michael

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Message 1206746 - Posted: 16 Mar 2012, 23:19:56 UTC

I am hearing the signal on 14.320 MHz as I type this. It reappeared at about 22:37 Universal Time. I urge anyone with access to a shortwave receiver to listen for it, and report any successful receptions here. Thanks. Michael

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Message 1223158 - Posted: 25 Apr 2012, 15:00:15 UTC

just need to ask adbt?

how can i Rx the sound?

u zd a shrt wave Rxr, is it lyk SHort Wave lyng Btwn AM & FM?

i am very concernd to know how you heard the sound?

am doing mu b.Tech in Electronics & Communoication Engineering


Justin

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Message 1223371 - Posted: 26 Apr 2012, 0:26:15 UTC - in response to Message 1223158.

Justin; I used an ordinary shortwave receiver, tuned to the 20 meter band frequency of 14.320 MHz. I rarely hear the signal any more, and it is usually very weak, now. The signal was at one time heard throughout North America. I haven't gotten any more reports of anyone receiving it recently. No satisfactory explanation for the signal was ever given. I still listen for it frequently, in hopes that it will return. Michael

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Message boards : Science (non-SETI) : Unusual pulsing signal on 14.320 MHz

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