Parents role in Education ?


log in

Advanced search

Message boards : Politics : Parents role in Education ?

Previous · 1 . . . 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 . . . 27 · Next
Author Message
Profile Chris S
Volunteer tester
Avatar
Send message
Joined: 19 Nov 00
Posts: 30989
Credit: 11,173,968
RAC: 19,934
United Kingdom
Message 1200931 - Posted: 29 Feb 2012, 13:16:43 UTC

I think more subjects have come in because too many students were failing at the core subjects of Maths, Science, English, & History. Hence the so called "soft" subjects of Media Studies, and Leisure & Tourism etc. Easier subjects mean higher pass rates, which means a better place in the league tables, which means continued funding. But the result is a gradual dumbing down of the population in terms of educational standards which leads to this Core Subjects.

Football in the UK does not have the impact upon education like it does in the USA. Over there I believe it is not uncommon for a 1st class football player to get a college Scholarship on the basis that the College team really need him, despite their lack of academic ability.



WinterKnight
Volunteer tester
Send message
Joined: 18 May 99
Posts: 8479
Credit: 22,995,581
RAC: 14,484
United Kingdom
Message 1201639 - Posted: 2 Mar 2012, 8:33:54 UTC

Another group call for better maths skills.

Poor numeracy 'blights the economy and ruins lives'

Poor numeracy is blighting Britain's economic performance and ruining lives, says a new charity launched to champion better maths skills.

The group, National Numeracy, says millions of people struggle to understand a payslip or a train timetable, or pay a household bill.

Government figures show almost half the working population of England have only primary school maths skills.

A government spokeswoman said poor numeracy was a national scandal.

The new organisation quotes from research which suggest that weak maths skills are linked with an array of poor life outcomes such as prison, unemployment, exclusion from school, poverty and long-term illness.

Profile Chris S
Volunteer tester
Avatar
Send message
Joined: 19 Nov 00
Posts: 30989
Credit: 11,173,968
RAC: 19,934
United Kingdom
Message 1206219 - Posted: 15 Mar 2012, 18:01:58 UTC
Last modified: 15 Mar 2012, 18:08:01 UTC

It just gets worse. I've KNOWN this for over 20 years, both as a member of the public, and certainly on the inside for 10 years as a teacher. When will the Establishment wake up ???

Kids are falling out of school at 16 simply unemployable. I know many people who run small to medium companies that won't take on anyone under the age of 21 unless they have been to an FE College and got some sort of education that they should have got in the first place.

Literacy

WinterKnight
Volunteer tester
Send message
Joined: 18 May 99
Posts: 8479
Credit: 22,995,581
RAC: 14,484
United Kingdom
Message 1206531 - Posted: 16 Mar 2012, 8:22:38 UTC
Last modified: 16 Mar 2012, 8:23:12 UTC

IMO the low standards highlighted by the news stories is that most students today are taught to pass the exam, not the subject. And that because most courses are modular the students in a lot of cases do not need to commit the module to long term memory because they will not get a question on it in a final exam several years down the track.

Profile Chris S
Volunteer tester
Avatar
Send message
Joined: 19 Nov 00
Posts: 30989
Credit: 11,173,968
RAC: 19,934
United Kingdom
Message 1206570 - Posted: 16 Mar 2012, 13:09:42 UTC

Some courses also like "Train To Gain" (T2G) don't have exams at all, the students produce a portfolio of work which is then externally moderated. Far too many students today just can't deal with traditional exams, so the courses have been designed to deal with that failing.

It's all symptomatic of the general dumbing down of UK education over the years. A decent HNC gained in the 1950/60's is about the equivalent of a 1st Class Honours degree today. We all know the UK is falling behind other European countries in terms of abilities in IT, Maths, and Literacy, and various schemes keep being tried to remedy this, but never seem to work.

The latest wheeze is Academies and Baccalaureates, neither of which in my opinion are going to make any difference, and increasing the school leaving age from 16 to 18 will only mean they'll be able to sign their name in joined up writing on the benefits claim form.

I gave up a long time ago.

Profile Chris S
Volunteer tester
Avatar
Send message
Joined: 19 Nov 00
Posts: 30989
Credit: 11,173,968
RAC: 19,934
United Kingdom
Message 1209990 - Posted: 25 Mar 2012, 10:14:33 UTC

More evidence that my view of today's parents being useless is correct.


Teaching Values

Profile Chris S
Volunteer tester
Avatar
Send message
Joined: 19 Nov 00
Posts: 30989
Credit: 11,173,968
RAC: 19,934
United Kingdom
Message 1210630 - Posted: 27 Mar 2012, 8:33:03 UTC

Just a few days to go before yet another Quango takes over FE .... sigh

YPLA

WinterKnight
Volunteer tester
Send message
Joined: 18 May 99
Posts: 8479
Credit: 22,995,581
RAC: 14,484
United Kingdom
Message 1213464 - Posted: 3 Apr 2012, 3:26:17 UTC
Last modified: 3 Apr 2012, 3:36:01 UTC

Will this be the shake-up that A-level's need to get students ready for university.

University dons take charge in exams shake-up

edit] also Michael Gove calls on watchdog to let universities set A-level examinations

My 1960's A levels where set by Oxford and Cambridge boards. English, Applied Maths and Physics from the Cambridge board and Pure Maths by the Oxford board. The reason, I was told by maths teacher, was because both boards would only allow you to do either pure or applied not both.

Profile Chris S
Volunteer tester
Avatar
Send message
Joined: 19 Nov 00
Posts: 30989
Credit: 11,173,968
RAC: 19,934
United Kingdom
Message 1213518 - Posted: 3 Apr 2012, 7:33:18 UTC

Although very welcome, its still treating the symptoms and not the root cause. That is disinterested parents and ineffectual mainstrenm education, coupled with political meddling causing exams to dumb down to maintain pass rates.

The move coincides with research published today revealing that many universities are being forced to provide booster lessons in the three Rs for first-year undergraduates because school leavers are so badly prepared for degree courses.

A study by Cambridge Assessment reported that many teenagers struggled to structure an essay, use correct spelling, punctuation and grammar and carry out independent research after being “spoon-fed” through A-levels.

Profile Chris S
Volunteer tester
Avatar
Send message
Joined: 19 Nov 00
Posts: 30989
Credit: 11,173,968
RAC: 19,934
United Kingdom
Message 1215028 - Posted: 7 Apr 2012, 7:53:17 UTC

They are pushing ahead with Academies despite widespread opposition. As I understand it they are free to set their own syllabuses, so they could have Outer Mongolian Pottery classes if they wished. The problem is that External
Examination Boards e.g. City & Guilds, AQA, Edexcel, OCR etc. who are the Awarding Bodies, may decline to provide exams for non standard subjects or curriculums.

Of course an Academy would be free to issue their own certificates, but they would be as worthless in the job market as the USA "degrees" you can buy on line. It will all end up in tears before bedtime, and it's another generation of kids that will lose out again.

Academies

Profile Chris S
Volunteer tester
Avatar
Send message
Joined: 19 Nov 00
Posts: 30989
Credit: 11,173,968
RAC: 19,934
United Kingdom
Message 1215614 - Posted: 8 Apr 2012, 12:35:02 UTC

Standards of reading need to rise - at the moment around one in six children leave primary school unable to read to the level we expect”

Department for Education spokeswoman


The NUT says nine out of 10 of its members who took part in an online survey said the check would give teachers no extra information on their pupils. Its general secretary Christine Blower said the check would not be good for pupils: "Five years old is too young to fail. They will know that they have not got it right and we think that will be demoralising".


So why don't parents teach their children about real life to be able to deal with this?

Phonics

Profile Chris S
Volunteer tester
Avatar
Send message
Joined: 19 Nov 00
Posts: 30989
Credit: 11,173,968
RAC: 19,934
United Kingdom
Message 1216101 - Posted: 9 Apr 2012, 13:21:39 UTC
Last modified: 9 Apr 2012, 13:24:11 UTC

I really hate quoting the Mail but it is relevant.

Boycott Ofsted

As an ex teacher I had to suffer the OFSTED inspections twice at my College, and I can tell you that the amount of time and money that was expended to deal with them was disproportionate to the benefits gained. They have 4 grades that they can award to a school or College

Grade 1 Outstanding
Grade 2 Good
Grade 3 Satisfactory
Grade 4 Inadequate

But they have this absolutely stupid mantra that any place that gets marked at the same grade for two years in a row is put on report for not improving.

Of particular concern are the 3,000 schools educating a million children that have been 'satisfactory' two inspections in a row. This is not good enough”

Sir Michael Wilshaw Ofsted chief inspector

Wilshaw is a complete and utter idiot who clearly isn't in touch with real life. Of course every educational establishment should strive to achieve better results, but the rules that he imposes would mean that in time EVERY school or College would have to achieve Grade 1 or be penalised.

It is my opinion that OFSTED should be shut down and a new inspection body with more sensible rules should take its place. Therefore I will support the Teachers Union action.

Spys

Profile Sirius B
Volunteer tester
Avatar
Send message
Joined: 26 Dec 00
Posts: 10131
Credit: 1,528,394
RAC: 283
United Kingdom
Message 1216321 - Posted: 9 Apr 2012, 22:53:27 UTC - in response to Message 1191767.

Shouldn't there be a class for parents:

How to deal with the fact your DNA makes morons?


Quite agree & here's a case in point as to why that is needed....

Students trash ferry

AND both universities say "no comment?" What a disgrace!
____________

Profile Chris S
Volunteer tester
Avatar
Send message
Joined: 19 Nov 00
Posts: 30989
Credit: 11,173,968
RAC: 19,934
United Kingdom
Message 1216533 - Posted: 10 Apr 2012, 9:10:18 UTC

Students have traditionally had Rag days where they let off steam and put cars on roofs etc, and in the main that is tolerated up to a point. But in this case there appears to have been criminal damage involved which is totally unacceptable, apart from being illegal.

I would query though that if as reported, it was true that they had clearly been drinking before the trip, why were they allowed to board the ship in the first place? I'm pretty sure I'm right that there are Maritime laws that say the Master of a vessel must not endanger the safety of the vessel or its passengers at any time, and letting a drunken horde of students to embark seems foolhardy at best.

However, there is no excuse for the behaviour that has been reported, and I hope the police will be meeting them upon their return, and taking the names and addresses of them all. At the very least they should be made to pay for any damage caused, in addition to any measures the Universities may take.

As regards the Universities concerned and their lack of response, the allegations against their students are quite serious, and I would expect that they will want to get full details of what happened from the ferry company, interview the students, and maybe take legal advice before they make any statement.

But overall I agree with Sirius it is quite disgraceful. As with the riots last summer there seems to be a view of "safety in numbers" but as all the rioters are finding out, you will be found and you will be punished, and I fully expect this to be the case here.

Profile Chris S
Volunteer tester
Avatar
Send message
Joined: 19 Nov 00
Posts: 30989
Credit: 11,173,968
RAC: 19,934
United Kingdom
Message 1216572 - Posted: 10 Apr 2012, 19:09:38 UTC

Update

WinterKnight
Volunteer tester
Send message
Joined: 18 May 99
Posts: 8479
Credit: 22,995,581
RAC: 14,484
United Kingdom
Message 1217300 - Posted: 12 Apr 2012, 15:50:58 UTC
Last modified: 12 Apr 2012, 15:51:24 UTC

I know this link is not strickly education but just had to post it. Especially as most years in my experience GCSE History is about the first half of the 20th century.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/history/titanic-anniversary/9199970/Twitter-users-thought-Titanic-disaster-was-just-a-film-plot.html

Profile Sirius B
Volunteer tester
Avatar
Send message
Joined: 26 Dec 00
Posts: 10131
Credit: 1,528,394
RAC: 283
United Kingdom
Message 1217308 - Posted: 12 Apr 2012, 16:09:45 UTC - in response to Message 1217300.

I know this link is not strickly education but just had to post it. Especially as most years in my experience GCSE History is about the first half of the 20th century.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/history/titanic-anniversary/9199970/Twitter-users-thought-Titanic-disaster-was-just-a-film-plot.html


Yes it is education! It's educating us to the "horrors" of today's youth. Not interested in reading/writing, much prefer SMS education...

Aw wight, got tat chum?
____________

Profile Chris S
Volunteer tester
Avatar
Send message
Joined: 19 Nov 00
Posts: 30989
Credit: 11,173,968
RAC: 19,934
United Kingdom
Message 1217311 - Posted: 12 Apr 2012, 16:23:53 UTC

It is still partly relevant here though because it just goes to underline how moronic some teenagers are these days. The 100 year anniversary has been mentioned across the press for weeks, but of course most of them would struggle to read more than the second paragraph on page 1. I'm not at all surprised by this report, just confirms yet again my view that mainstream education is failing and that parents are next to useless at bringing up kids.

At the moment there is a population explosion in South London and you can't move for young women pushing buggys with babies. And you'd be hard pushed to see a wedding or engagement ring on any of them, or hear much more than 1/2 a dozen vaguely joined up syllables while they natter to their mobile.

Whatever happened to Family Planning? These days it seems to be a one night stand after the pub on a Saturday night, with jack the lad doing a runner later. What chance have teachers got against that sort of background? Perhaps we should consider the 1 child regime they have in China, at least it would save on the school building program.

WinterKnight
Volunteer tester
Send message
Joined: 18 May 99
Posts: 8479
Credit: 22,995,581
RAC: 14,484
United Kingdom
Message 1217324 - Posted: 12 Apr 2012, 17:08:33 UTC - in response to Message 1217311.

It is still partly relevant here though because it just goes to underline how moronic some teenagers are these days. The 100 year anniversary has been mentioned across the press for weeks, but of course most of them would struggle to read more than the second paragraph on page 1. I'm not at all surprised by this report, just confirms yet again my view that mainstream education is failing and that parents are next to useless at bringing up kids.

At the moment there is a population explosion in South London and you can't move for young women pushing buggys with babies. And you'd be hard pushed to see a wedding or engagement ring on any of them, or hear much more than 1/2 a dozen vaguely joined up syllables while they natter to their mobile.

Whatever happened to Family Planning? These days it seems to be a one night stand after the pub on a Saturday night, with jack the lad doing a runner later. What chance have teachers got against that sort of background? Perhaps we should consider the 1 child regime they have in China, at least it would save on the school building program.


population explosion
Because with Child Tax Credits, or if they work part time, Working Tax Credits, they have a guarenteed income higher than they could possibly earn if they worked full time. Plus they get council housing, so they can invite anyone they like in without parental control.

Profile Chris S
Volunteer tester
Avatar
Send message
Joined: 19 Nov 00
Posts: 30989
Credit: 11,173,968
RAC: 19,934
United Kingdom
Message 1217343 - Posted: 12 Apr 2012, 18:04:13 UTC

Hi WK. There is certainly a section of female society that view having kids as a meal ticket. The Council house them, and the Social put money in their pocket. If the errant father gives a few bob here and there that is a bonus. OK it's a grade C life with a screaming kid, but it's better that working for a living stacking shelves in a supermarket.

There is also an added dimension to this as well. Many young women see having kids as an insurance policy for their old age. It's not likely this government will do anything for me when I get old they say, but if I've got a couple of kids, at least I've got some chance of being looked after when I can't manage.

It's a whole vicious circle that just carries on ...

Previous · 1 . . . 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 . . . 27 · Next

Message boards : Politics : Parents role in Education ?

Copyright © 2014 University of California