Labyrinth of Light (Oct 06 2011)

Message boards : Technical News : Labyrinth of Light (Oct 06 2011)

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John McLeod VII
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Message 1164379 - Posted: 21 Oct 2011, 23:13:24 UTC - in response to Message 1164174.

Thank you Matt !

Just wondering, have you considered moving storage intensive tasks to PCI based flash storage ? We have had great success using them for datawarehousing.

Flash has a rather limited number of write cycles. There are some places in the architecture that may burn through the entire write cycle lifetime of a flash device in under a year. Other places have many fewer writes and may be more suitable.


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Message 1165439 - Posted: 26 Oct 2011, 7:54:57 UTC - in response to Message 1164379.

Thank you Matt !

Just wondering, have you considered moving storage intensive tasks to PCI based flash storage ? We have had great success using them for datawarehousing.

Flash has a rather limited number of write cycles. There are some places in the architecture that may burn through the entire write cycle lifetime of a flash device in under a year. Other places have many fewer writes and may be more suitable.

At the rate the data goes though here I would give a SSD array a few months.
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Message 1165710 - Posted: 27 Oct 2011, 6:36:36 UTC - in response to Message 1165439.

At the rate the data goes though here I would give a SSD array a few months.

A low capacity retail SSD, most likely. A high end retail SSD, a year or 2. An enterprise class SSD, 5+ years, easily.
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Dena Wiltsie
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Message 1166359 - Posted: 30 Oct 2011, 2:15:34 UTC - in response to Message 1165710.

At the rate the data goes though here I would give a SSD array a few months.

A low capacity retail SSD, most likely. A high end retail SSD, a year or 2. An enterprise class SSD, 5+ years, easily.

Without more information, it could be one of these.

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Message 1166599 - Posted: 31 Oct 2011, 2:17:31 UTC - in response to Message 1166359.

At the rate the data goes though here I would give a SSD array a few months.

A low capacity retail SSD, most likely. A high end retail SSD, a year or 2. An enterprise class SSD, 5+ years, easily.

Without more information, it could be one of these.

I could not locate how many write cycles they are good for (unless it is the 600,000 number).


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Dena Wiltsie
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Message 1166607 - Posted: 31 Oct 2011, 3:22:49 UTC - in response to Message 1166599.

At the rate the data goes though here I would give a SSD array a few months.

A low capacity retail SSD, most likely. A high end retail SSD, a year or 2. An enterprise class SSD, 5+ years, easily.

Without more information, it could be one of these.

I could not locate how many write cycles they are good for (unless it is the 600,000 number).

The number of cycles is not listed because they use the same RAM memory used in all computers for processor memory. While this company also make flash drives, the link points to drives that have unlimited cycles. The disadvantage is the size of the drive is smaller and the cost higher but the advantage is very high speed and a long life.

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Message 1167077 - Posted: 2 Nov 2011, 1:06:30 UTC - in response to Message 1166607.

At the rate the data goes though here I would give a SSD array a few months.

A low capacity retail SSD, most likely. A high end retail SSD, a year or 2. An enterprise class SSD, 5+ years, easily.

Without more information, it could be one of these.

I could not locate how many write cycles they are good for (unless it is the 600,000 number).

The number of cycles is not listed because they use the same RAM memory used in all computers for processor memory. While this company also make flash drives, the link points to drives that have unlimited cycles. The disadvantage is the size of the drive is smaller and the cost higher but the advantage is very high speed and a long life.

OK, the contents of RAM disappears when the power goes out. So, how are they keeping the data when the computer is turned off?


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Message 1167090 - Posted: 2 Nov 2011, 3:45:01 UTC - in response to Message 1167077.

At the rate the data goes though here I would give a SSD array a few months.

A low capacity retail SSD, most likely. A high end retail SSD, a year or 2. An enterprise class SSD, 5+ years, easily.

Without more information, it could be one of these.

I could not locate how many write cycles they are good for (unless it is the 600,000 number).

The number of cycles is not listed because they use the same RAM memory used in all computers for processor memory. While this company also make flash drives, the link points to drives that have unlimited cycles. The disadvantage is the size of the drive is smaller and the cost higher but the advantage is very high speed and a long life.

OK, the contents of RAM disappears when the power goes out. So, how are they keeping the data when the computer is turned off?

Battery back up and copy to flash when the power is turned off. Some of the older systems I looked at copy to a hard drive instead.

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Message boards : Technical News : Labyrinth of Light (Oct 06 2011)


 
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