For the folks who belive mars can have life.


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Profile Michael John Hind
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Message 1147621 - Posted: 31 Aug 2011, 19:45:35 UTC - in response to Message 1147533.

then life must abound throughout the universe.


But not as we know it Jim.


A phenomenal amount of money is being and has been spent on space exploration.
What an embarrassment if all we find in the future is just one planet that has life on it.......in the form of a "mushroom". No, there's got to be something thing out there, a planet with an atmosphere so protecting the planets surface from extreme radiation. With an atmosphere although poisonous to us and other life on Earth is able to support some form of organic growth, at least.

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Message 1147745 - Posted: 1 Sep 2011, 0:21:49 UTC - in response to Message 1147621.

A phenomenal amount of money is being and has been spent on space exploration.
What an embarrassment if all we find in the future is just one planet that has life on it.......in the form of a "mushroom". ...

There would be no 'embarrassment' at all. Such a find would be startling!


In Science there is no 'right' or 'wrong' or any room for prejudice. There is only the observed Truth.

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Message 1147813 - Posted: 1 Sep 2011, 4:22:27 UTC - in response to Message 1142322.

The one thing that life on Earth teaches: if there is liquid water, life will find a way.


Where ever water has existed on earth, life has always found a way. If bacteria can thrive is arsonic then it can live on Mars. Either NASA is looking in the wrong spots, or we are being told the wrong things while they discover life. There are rivers UNDER the Amazon river, nearly as big as the Amazon itself...OVER 6,500 FEET below the Amazon. So if water can flow freely, under the Amazon, and we already know life can exist in total darkness, then why not on Mars?

If you ask me, all these major discoveries regarding life lately, is going to lead up to an announcement by NASA that some form of life exists on Mars. Every time they say there is a huge Mars announcement, they have stopped short of saying they found life every time. I think it's just a matter of time before they actually announce it. And i don't mean aliens.

Jupiter's moon Europa and Saturn's Enceladus and maybe even Mars, are probably the best candidates for actual primitive life in our solar system. Be it jellyfish or fish or whatever. Titan is a good candidate too, but more on a bacterial level.
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Message 1147847 - Posted: 1 Sep 2011, 8:04:31 UTC

Regarding how much money is being spent on the exploration of space. I read once that western women (Europe and North America) spend more money on make up and beauty supplies in one year than the entire NASA budget and that Revlon has about ten times the profits of all the aerospace companies combined.
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Profile William Rothamel
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Message 1147874 - Posted: 1 Sep 2011, 10:40:39 UTC - in response to Message 1147847.
Last modified: 1 Sep 2011, 10:47:15 UTC

Doubt that Revlon exceeds even Boeing in revenue or earnings.

Boeing roughly 3.6 Billion per year and Revlon 1.3 Billion most recently.

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Message 1148437 - Posted: 3 Sep 2011, 1:28:18 UTC - in response to Message 1147169.

If life is found in Europa, Titan, Mars, then probably would be on the bacterial level, multicellular; but doubtfull that any other planetary or lunar body in the Solar System would have inteligent life other than Earth. No doubt that life exists in the Milky Way, just hard to imagine a galaxy with over 100 billion stars,and Sol is the only star that hosts a planet with life.

Profile William Rothamel
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Message 1148446 - Posted: 3 Sep 2011, 2:23:47 UTC - in response to Message 1148437.
Last modified: 3 Sep 2011, 2:24:18 UTC

When you think about all the things that have to be in balance for intelligent life then you may feel that perhaps there are extraordinarily few such planets in the Milky Way system. Such planets might be hopelessly far away.

Profile Michael John Hind
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Message 1148582 - Posted: 3 Sep 2011, 18:19:43 UTC
Last modified: 3 Sep 2011, 18:22:00 UTC

There would be no 'embarrassment' at all. Such a find would be startling!


Ml1, us who take a great interest in the search for life in the universe would not
I suspect be startled by some form of life being found on another planet. I suspect that we all expect something to be found but tend to generally disagree as to whether or not the life discovered will be that of the intelligent type.
...I would be startled though if we did discover intelligent or even human life out there in the universe somewhere. If we found intelligent life in the universe via signals picked-up by Seti then I'd be Startled and then become very excited by it. Just hope though that if they were vastly more intelligent than us that they do not reply on oil as a commodity. For if they did and they were running very short of it they may came and raid Earth in an attempt to steal ours.

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Message 1148628 - Posted: 3 Sep 2011, 20:05:40 UTC - in response to Message 1140692.

Mars was warmer in the past. The temp may be warmer underground. Digging may find fossils left over from the warmer climate that Mars once had.

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Message 1148716 - Posted: 3 Sep 2011, 23:16:30 UTC - in response to Message 1148582.

Probably, inteligent life would not look like humans, but i suspect that inteligent life in another planet would be bipedal. Nature tends to favor life forms that have a better ability to survive the elements. The laws of nature apply the same to every point in space and life is no exception.

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Message 1148858 - Posted: 4 Sep 2011, 10:34:55 UTC
Last modified: 4 Sep 2011, 10:41:42 UTC

Well, taking that view, wouldn't the most practical lifeform be tripedal? A 3 legged stool is inherently stable, whereas a 2 o4 4 legged one isn't. Even better would be pentpedal, most computer chairs are 5 legged as they are virtually impossible to tip over.

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Message 1148889 - Posted: 4 Sep 2011, 14:59:26 UTC

The number of extremities and the type of locomotion maybe depends on the conditions of the the planet where the species live. if there is a high gravity the species may move pentpedal or there won't be any extremities (like a snake). A lower gravity may gives preferences to bipedal locomotion.

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Message 1148908 - Posted: 4 Sep 2011, 15:59:16 UTC

Bipedal locomotion pre-supposes that the lifeform has an inbuilt balance sensor, able to compensate as required. Pentapedal may be more appropriate in high gravity situations, I agree.

A spider is a great example of a movement machine, with 8 legs and a low slung body, with a corresponding low C of G. even losing a couple of legs still enables it to negotiate almost any terrain.

As you also suggest, a non-pedal lifeform e.g. a snake, could also easily traverse the same terrain, but probably at a lower speed rate. Both lifeforms could be well adjusted to an alien planets topography.

Are spiders intelligent? Well, look at the webs they weave, they certainly possess a talent for being able to construct a well designed food collecting apparatus, often between distances dozens of times their own width, and which are resistant to minor winds.

Life must evolve to suit it's surroundings, otherwise it dies out. The most suitable will be more likely to survive and propagate. I reckon that Darwinism could well apply elsewhere in the universe.

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Message 1148919 - Posted: 4 Sep 2011, 16:56:24 UTC - in response to Message 1148908.

Bipedalism for four-limbed creatures allows us to swing through the trees as well as walk upright in the savannas. We can also stay on the ground and pick fruit, nuts and and berries.

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Message 1148974 - Posted: 4 Sep 2011, 19:16:51 UTC

More limbs means more brain power needed for control means less brain power available for abstract thought. I would imagine that 2 legs would be the most likely for intelligent life.

Asymmetrical, odd numbered limbed life would take even more brain power than even limbed creatures so while three legs is possible, three legs plus intelligence is less likely.
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Message 1149221 - Posted: 5 Sep 2011, 17:05:34 UTC - in response to Message 1148908.

Inteligent life being pentpedal, or tri-pedal, that would pose great stress in the skelletal structure. Like here on Earth, pentpedal locomotion would apply more toward the small life forms, such as insects, archanids. Whereas bipedal locomotion allows more speed, running from danger, hunting. Could not imagine a 7 feet tall tarantula, just not nature efficient.

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Message 1149284 - Posted: 5 Sep 2011, 18:34:31 UTC - in response to Message 1149221.
Last modified: 5 Sep 2011, 18:34:44 UTC

Inteligent life being pentpedal, or tri-pedal, that would pose great stress in the skelletal structure. Like here on Earth, pentpedal locomotion would apply more toward the small life forms, such as insects, archanids. Whereas bipedal locomotion allows more speed, running from danger, hunting. Could not imagine a 7 feet tall tarantula, just not nature efficient.

Let's see here: Cheetah, cat, about 70 MPH. Usain Bolt, Human, about 23 MPH. Faster?

Conclusion: Quadrupeds are faster than bipeds.
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Message 1149341 - Posted: 5 Sep 2011, 20:59:32 UTC
Last modified: 5 Sep 2011, 21:01:08 UTC

Hmmmm

Spiders

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Message 1149350 - Posted: 5 Sep 2011, 21:11:25 UTC - in response to Message 1149284.

conclusion: inteligent life here on Earth= bipedal,which is higher primates= humans. Survival of the fitest. Yes, mamelians are mostly four legged, with the exceptions of marine mamals; however, apes are mostly bipedal. Bird are bipedal too, if we want to emphasize bipedalism.

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Message 1149365 - Posted: 5 Sep 2011, 21:36:14 UTC - in response to Message 1148919.

Quick question for whoever is familiar, is the Hubble space telescope able to identify planets of Earth's size? Has the Centauri system been observed by the Hubble space telescope?

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Message boards : SETI@home Science : For the folks who belive mars can have life.

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