Worlds largest cruise ships


log in

Advanced search

Message boards : Science (non-SETI) : Worlds largest cruise ships

Author Message
Profile Chris SProject donor
Volunteer tester
Avatar
Send message
Joined: 19 Nov 00
Posts: 32345
Credit: 14,277,608
RAC: 7,328
United Kingdom
Message 1112026 - Posted: 1 Jun 2011, 13:51:00 UTC

While the length of the Allure of the Seas is the same as that of her sister, 360 metres (1,181 ft)[4], she is actually some 50 millimetres (2 in) longer than the Oasis of the Seas. However, according to the shipyard this is not intentional and such small differences in length may occur simply due to the temperature of the steel in a ship as big as this.


“The coefficient of thermal expansion for steel is 0.00000645in/in/deg F.


My maths say that a ship at 1181 feet, is 14,172 inches long. Lets say for arguments sake the ship went from 60F to 80F. That works out at 1.81".

Well well would you believe it, I didn't until I worked it out!

Profile ML1
Volunteer tester
Send message
Joined: 25 Nov 01
Posts: 8574
Credit: 4,234,167
RAC: 808
United Kingdom
Message 1112052 - Posted: 1 Jun 2011, 15:17:53 UTC - in response to Message 1112026.
Last modified: 1 Jun 2011, 15:19:59 UTC

“The coefficient of thermal expansion for steel is 0.00000645in/in/deg F.


My maths say that a ship at 1181 feet, is 14,172 inches long. Lets say for arguments sake the ship went from 60F to 80F. That works out at 1.81".

Well well would you believe it, I didn't until I worked it out!

Except I find it much easier to work in metric units... All the conversion factors are contrived to be exactly 1 (with the exception of the fundamentals such as pi, e, h, etc...).

For an obvious everyday example, note the expansion joints running across roads for road bridges... Some USA bridges failed in recent years and killed a few people because of the extra stress due to some (big) roller bearings needed for expansion of the structure having had corroded solid...

Expansion/contraction and flexing are designed into aircraft. I've looked at that and then also on another design I had to go to great lengths (bad pun) to design and build a computer controlled instrument for nanofabrication such that temperature changes didn't cause the work area to shift away to oblivion. At nm scales, a mm is as good as a million miles away!

Then also, an inch of expansion can cause disaster if your drive shafts, pipes, and cabling can't stretch or flex that far for your ship...


Keep searchin',
Martin
____________
See new freedom: Mageia4
Linux Voice See & try out your OS Freedom!
The Future is what We make IT (GPLv3)

Profile Chris SProject donor
Volunteer tester
Avatar
Send message
Joined: 19 Nov 00
Posts: 32345
Credit: 14,277,608
RAC: 7,328
United Kingdom
Message 1112298 - Posted: 2 Jun 2011, 10:23:30 UTC

computer controlled instrument for nanofabrication such that temperature changes didn't cause the work area to shift away to oblivion. At nm scales, a mm is as good as a million miles away!


When I was studying Metrology at Technical College in the mid 1960's, the Lab had a comparator in a glass case that would measure down to a millionth of an inch. You could set up a slipgauge in it, very gently breathe on it, and watch the needle go off the scale !!

Message boards : Science (non-SETI) : Worlds largest cruise ships

Copyright © 2014 University of California