Old vs New cpu's


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nairb
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Message 1105520 - Posted: 12 May 2011, 19:51:06 UTC

Yes, those old graphics cards. The VESA Local Bus cards or VLB cards are just great for the size of the things. I still have a few of them and the m/b's they go in. Oh and the Hercules compatible cards too. I have 3 RM Nimbus machines which need their own monitors as well. Nothing standard with them.

And those old m/b's which had a turbo button. Supose you dont need one on a quad core cpu. Nor do we need 5.25 inch drives either. Which is all good news.

The latest fastest kit is always the best...... But I still like the old socket 8 cpus. Huge, weight a ton and covered in gold - except the 1meg l2 versions which seem to be black (Mine are anyway).

One use for the old socket 3 cpus is to run Screen Antics Johnny Castaway screensaver - I dont think seti runs in 8 meg ram

Nairb
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Message 1105524 - Posted: 12 May 2011, 20:01:19 UTC

After almost 12 years I'm still running my first cruncher.

1995 – Micron Millennia Mxe
200MHz Pentium MMx P55 128MB UW2SCSI
Processor: 1 Intel x86 Family 5 Model 4 Stepping 4 199MHz
Processor features: fpu tsc mmx
OS: Windows XP: Professional x86 Edition, Service Pack 2, (05.01.2600.00)
Memory: 127.55 MB physical, 507.49 MB virtual

With the rise of electrical cost$ and being a pensioner now I have had to back off a little with crunching on my older computers. Cost is too much. RAC of 20 at $100US a year for this puppy.

At the 12 year mark it will be interesting to see who all is still running the old crunchers.
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Message 1105531 - Posted: 12 May 2011, 20:33:39 UTC - in response to Message 1105524.

I still have a Pentium II @ 300MHz with Window for Workgroups(3.11).
The most stable version of Windows 3.x, IMO.
But it still works, a bit slow, internet is faster as HDD :)


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Message 1105557 - Posted: 12 May 2011, 22:17:46 UTC


:)
Don't you think this thread becomes "A Gathering of Old Men"
to chat about "Good Ol' Days"?

;)


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Dave
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Message 1105718 - Posted: 13 May 2011, 16:02:21 UTC

What is the slowest CPU out there still gathering results?

nemesis
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Message 1105721 - Posted: 13 May 2011, 16:22:52 UTC - in response to Message 1105557.


:)
Don't you think this thread becomes "A Gathering of Old Men"
to chat about "Good Ol' Days"?

;)



i don't think its a "good old days" scenario.
especially when you think how expensive those early
processors were.

i'm ashamed to say that i could buy five
GTX 590's for what i paid for "the state of the art"
PII 400mhz and thats not adjusted for inflation.


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Profile Mike
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Message 1105726 - Posted: 13 May 2011, 16:44:05 UTC - in response to Message 1105721.


:)
Don't you think this thread becomes "A Gathering of Old Men"
to chat about "Good Ol' Days"?

;)



i don't think its a "good old days" scenario.
especially when you think how expensive those early
processors were.

i'm ashamed to say that i could buy five
GTX 590's for what i paid for "the state of the art"
PII 400mhz and thats not adjusted for inflation.



Yep, thats right phud.
I paid $2000 for my Amiga 1000 in the 80th.
And additional $1000 for a 20 MB hard drive.


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Profile Paul D Harris
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Message 1105742 - Posted: 13 May 2011, 17:30:17 UTC - in response to Message 1105557.


:)
Don't you think this thread becomes "A Gathering of Old Men"
to chat about "Good Ol' Days"?

;)


We all are getting older even you. Some are older than you and some are younger than you. I remember when calculators were all the rage some could be programed like a computer in the early 70,s before there were personal computers everybody had fancy calculators. Even before the calculators there was the slide rule which I used. Then in the early 60,s they had mechanical adding machines and before that abacus.
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Message 1105750 - Posted: 13 May 2011, 17:43:07 UTC - in response to Message 1105742.


:)
Don't you think this thread becomes "A Gathering of Old Men"
to chat about "Good Ol' Days"?

;)


We all are getting older even you. Some are older than you and some are younger than you. I remember when calculators were all the rage some could be programed like a computer in the early 70,s before there were personal computers everybody had fancy calculators. Even before the calculators there was the slide rule which I used. Then in the early 60,s they had mechanical adding machines and before that abacus.

Maybe I was not clear enough -
"A Gathering of Old Men" includes me :) (born 1960) and my posts about old hardware in this thread.

I remember the Texas Instruments programmable calculators (using some sort of magnetic tape/cards/sticks).


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Profile James Sotherden
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Message 1105754 - Posted: 13 May 2011, 17:58:44 UTC - in response to Message 1105750.


:)
Don't you think this thread becomes "A Gathering of Old Men"
to chat about "Good Ol' Days"?

;)


We all are getting older even you. Some are older than you and some are younger than you. I remember when calculators were all the rage some could be programed like a computer in the early 70,s before there were personal computers everybody had fancy calculators. Even before the calculators there was the slide rule which I used. Then in the early 60,s they had mechanical adding machines and before that abacus.

Maybe I was not clear enough -
"A Gathering of Old Men" includes me :) (born 1960) and my posts about old hardware in this thread.

I remember the Texas Instruments programmable calculators (using some sort of magnetic tape/cards/sticks).


Born 1952 here. Your borderline old:)My first calculator was a texas intsrument. just four functions. cost $40.00 back in 1975 or 76. cant remember, Im old you know.
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Message 1105756 - Posted: 13 May 2011, 18:10:12 UTC - in response to Message 1105754.


:)
Don't you think this thread becomes "A Gathering of Old Men"
to chat about "Good Ol' Days"?

;)


We all are getting older even you. Some are older than you and some are younger than you. I remember when calculators were all the rage some could be programed like a computer in the early 70,s before there were personal computers everybody had fancy calculators. Even before the calculators there was the slide rule which I used. Then in the early 60,s they had mechanical adding machines and before that abacus.

Maybe I was not clear enough -
"A Gathering of Old Men" includes me :) (born 1960) and my posts about old hardware in this thread.

I remember the Texas Instruments programmable calculators (using some sort of magnetic tape/cards/sticks).


Born 1952 here. Your borderline old:)My first calculator was a texas intsrument. just four functions. cost $40.00 back in 1975 or 76. cant remember, Im old you know.


And I remember the first Bulgarian electronic calculators (~1970) size of a typewriter
and cost of a Russian car (~$4000) that can do only + - * /
(no home user had this type of calculator, only factories/government offices)


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Message 1105774 - Posted: 13 May 2011, 19:01:28 UTC - in response to Message 1105756.

My oldest compy: The slide rule, also known colloquially as a slipstick, is a mechanical analog computer. 8^)
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nairb
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Message 1105776 - Posted: 13 May 2011, 19:03:40 UTC

For me, its the speed that todays wonder hardware becomes trash. And do we need a quad core m/c to surf the net or write docs. A 1 gig pentium 3 will do that. But the cost of the old kit was the killer. And it still makes me smile to have some socket 3 or 8 machine maxed out on edo ram and top spec cpu for the price of a couple of beers. And the lights dont go dim when its switched on.

But the most impressive thing is the gain in processing power.

I think my pentium 60 with 128meg of edo is maybe the lowest power that still makes the deadline for a long w/u. I think it took ~36 days. Utter waste of electricity I know. How many w/u would a quad core or equivalent do in that time.

But then in 10 years time a quad core will be sooo yesterday.

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nemesis
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Message 1105806 - Posted: 13 May 2011, 21:44:42 UTC - in response to Message 1105774.

My oldest compy: The slide rule, also known colloquially as a slipstick, is a mechanical analog computer. 8^)

sorry...
the oldest computer you have is the one between your ears.
more complex than anything intel, amd or ibm make.
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Message 1105823 - Posted: 13 May 2011, 23:40:28 UTC - in response to Message 1105742.

...
I remember when calculators were all the rage some could be programed like a computer in the early 70,s before there were personal computers everybody had fancy calculators. Even before the calculators there was the slide rule which I used. Then in the early 60,s they had mechanical adding machines and before that abacus.

And we're still suffering with a 10 based number system because that's how many fingers most people have...
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Message 1105826 - Posted: 14 May 2011, 0:08:09 UTC

Don't knock the old programmable calculators. I bought a Sinclair Cambridge (80 step program) to spec the central heating system in my first house. It enabled me to size the radiators, locate the manifolds for the microbore pipework etc...

F.
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Message 1106128 - Posted: 14 May 2011, 13:34:03 UTC - in response to Message 1105823.
Last modified: 14 May 2011, 13:34:42 UTC

And we're still suffering with a 10 based number system because that's how many fingers most people have...

Quite a few long-standing Yakuza have to count in octal...

You going quantum and dreaming quantum superposition?

Or there is the old Babylonian (base-60) system...


And what was the number base that Vulcans used for their mental arithmetic?

Keep searchin',
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Message 1106170 - Posted: 14 May 2011, 16:44:11 UTC

i think Douglas Adams was pointing us toward a 42 based method.



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Message 1106210 - Posted: 14 May 2011, 19:44:42 UTC - in response to Message 1106128.

Or there is the old Babylonian (base-60) system...

Like our version of it (now used only for time measured in hours, and for angular measure in degrees), the ancient Mesopotamian sexagesimal system used an auxiliary base of 10. A true base-60 notation would have a unique symbol for every digital value from 0 to 59—not very practical.
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Message 1106239 - Posted: 14 May 2011, 22:01:13 UTC

I bought a Sinclair Cambridge


I bought a Sinclair Oxford with RPN ! (idiot)

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Message boards : Number crunching : Old vs New cpu's

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