A Sign The World Is Ending


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Message 1062147 - Posted: 31 Dec 2010, 23:11:51 UTC

I went on an IPV6 course in 1998, is it finally happening???
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Message 1062158 - Posted: 31 Dec 2010, 23:24:57 UTC - in response to Message 1062147.

I went on an IPV6 course in 1998, is it finally happening???

Kicking and screaming in a lot of cases. There is about to be no choice.
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Message 1062198 - Posted: 1 Jan 2011, 0:32:24 UTC - in response to Message 1062026.

Having kids is a good network diagnostic tool.

LOL

And if they can't hack it back up, It's a REAL problem. :D


I asked 'the experts' and they did not notice any FB problems. I am snootily informed that FB being down for '8 hours' is OK because of the seemingly infinite variety of other 'instant communication' methods available which are in constant - and simultaneous - use.
As long as (at least) their "status" is updated every day, then all's well in the facebook world.

I'm sure that's a relief to all of us who still use buggy whips and rotary dial phones ... .



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Message 1063289 - Posted: 4 Jan 2011, 2:25:08 UTC

Beer taps run dry.

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Message 1063293 - Posted: 4 Jan 2011, 2:47:19 UTC - in response to Message 1062126.

The real sign the world is ending is that IPV4 is about to run out...

I hate to verify my ignorance of the modern world but, what is a IPV4?
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Message 1063306 - Posted: 4 Jan 2011, 3:23:49 UTC - in response to Message 1063293.

The real sign the world is ending is that IPV4 is about to run out...

I hate to verify my ignorance of the modern world but, what is a IPV4?

Potaroo.net has a page dedicated to how fast we are using them.

Wikipedia has an article that describes what they are.
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Message 1063333 - Posted: 4 Jan 2011, 4:59:58 UTC - in response to Message 1063293.

The real sign the world is ending is that IPV4 is about to run out...

I hate to verify my ignorance of the modern world but, what is a IPV4?


Hi Tom,

IPV4 is the system that allocates IP addresses to computers and all that gubbins. In short, they designed the system so that it would provide about 4 billion IP addresses, a unique ID for every computer and internet enabled item on the internet. It's a 32-bit system. This doesn't include all the computers and stuff that have private IP addresses behind routers. We are rapidly approaching that limit. This is called the dotted quad... like 82.18.163.143

The replacement system is IPV6. They have been trying to get acceptance for if for years (around 1998 or so, I think), but the ISPs and others have been dragging their heels over it's implementation. It's not an unlimited system, but may as well be for it provides squillion's of numbers to use (technical term there, lol!). Honest answer, I'm not sure, and haven't got time to look it all up before going to work. It comes in the format - de80::ac97:3162:55b5:554f%12 - a little more complicated to understand, but provides a far larger number of addresses.

The links will provide more information, and i may check them out myself later after work...

Giz.

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Message 1063337 - Posted: 4 Jan 2011, 5:12:34 UTC

Facebook had better never go down. I mean what's going to happen to my farm there?
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Message 1063577 - Posted: 5 Jan 2011, 3:59:55 UTC - in response to Message 1063333.

The real sign the world is ending is that IPV4 is about to run out...

I hate to verify my ignorance of the modern world but, what is a IPV4?


Hi Tom,

IPV4 is the system that allocates IP addresses to computers and all that gubbins. In short, they designed the system so that it would provide about 4 billion IP addresses, a unique ID for every computer and internet enabled item on the internet. It's a 32-bit system. This doesn't include all the computers and stuff that have private IP addresses behind routers. We are rapidly approaching that limit. This is called the dotted quad... like 82.18.163.143

The replacement system is IPV6. They have been trying to get acceptance for if for years (around 1998 or so, I think), but the ISPs and others have been dragging their heels over it's implementation. It's not an unlimited system, but may as well be for it provides squillion's of numbers to use (technical term there, lol!). Honest answer, I'm not sure, and haven't got time to look it all up before going to work. It comes in the format - de80::ac97:3162:55b5:554f%12 - a little more complicated to understand, but provides a far larger number of addresses.

The links will provide more information, and i may check them out myself later after work...

Giz.

IPV6 provides 2^64 networks of 2^64 devices each. Each household is supposed to get a /64 which leaves 2^64 devices in that household. Companies will probably get, and households will possibly get a /48 that allows for 65536 locations each of which has a 2^64 devices. ISPs will get larger allocations based on how many customers they have.
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Message 1065581 - Posted: 11 Jan 2011, 13:24:50 UTC

it provides squillion's of numbers to use (technical term there, lol!).


Sounds a perfectly good terminology to me! :-)

The fact is that it's going to cost money to upgrade to from IPv4 to IPv6, so of course people are putting it off. But the world moves on and has to be allowed for. But people just haven't thought about the sheer number of IP addresses needed in life in this modern world.

For example, we already have intelligent fridges that read the barcodes on food as you put it in the fridge. It can then order replacement food over the internet when the use by date is reached. We already have cordless automatic vacuum cleaners that could be activated remotely by Internet. Also the same with lawnmowers. When will cars switch themselves on and warm up with a click from a computer?

How long will IPv6 last???



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Message 1065597 - Posted: 11 Jan 2011, 14:32:28 UTC - in response to Message 1065581.
Last modified: 11 Jan 2011, 14:33:43 UTC

When will cars switch themselves on and warm up with a click from a computer?


I can buy one now to work with a smart phone. It gets cold here, eh?

How long will IPv6 last???


That will be market driven. There are a zillion (another technical term) ways around the limits of addresses, already in use on distributed buses in mobile applications. The same thing happens there - somebody thinks up a bus standard with "way more addresses than anybody will ever need" (famous last words), and then the users saturate the addresses within a few months.

The cheap and nasty way around this is to create devices that are local bus controllers, with their own set of addresses below them. A typical message in ARINC/IEE/MIL-STD/Canbus today might look like:

{start block}{for address X}{instruction}{end block}

X is a device using the "standard" addressing system. It decodes "instruction" and figures out it is supposed to turn on/turn off/whatever sub-device X.1234. Depending on how much people are willing to pay, and how long your messages are allowed to be, you can overnight increase the number of bus addresses by a factor of 8, 16, 32, or whatever.

In my experience the Standards Development community is always a few months or years behind industry. When people need something, they make it. Standards come later.
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Message 1065610 - Posted: 11 Jan 2011, 15:46:36 UTC - in response to Message 1063337.

Facebook had better never go down. I mean what's going to happen to my farm there?

Another farmer?

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Message 1065632 - Posted: 11 Jan 2011, 16:25:47 UTC - in response to Message 1065597.

When will cars switch themselves on and warm up with a click from a computer?


I can buy one now to work with a smart phone. It gets cold here, eh?

How long will IPv6 last???


That will be market driven. There are a zillion (another technical term) ways around the limits of addresses, already in use on distributed buses in mobile applications. The same thing happens there - somebody thinks up a bus standard with "way more addresses than anybody will ever need" (famous last words), and then the users saturate the addresses within a few months.

The cheap and nasty way around this is to create devices that are local bus controllers, with their own set of addresses below them. A typical message in ARINC/IEE/MIL-STD/Canbus today might look like:

{start block}{for address X}{instruction}{end block}

X is a device using the "standard" addressing system. It decodes "instruction" and figures out it is supposed to turn on/turn off/whatever sub-device X.1234. Depending on how much people are willing to pay, and how long your messages are allowed to be, you can overnight increase the number of bus addresses by a factor of 8, 16, 32, or whatever.

In my experience the Standards Development community is always a few months or years behind industry. When people need something, they make it. Standards come later.

There are enough web addresses for 667220327295957771496812 / square meter of surface area of the earth. That is 6* 10^23 / square meter or 2^63 / square meter. Or put another way, 2^31 times the entire number of web addresses under IPv4 / square meter.

Conclusion: We are going to have to colonize the rest of the solar system space before there is any chance at all of runing out of IPV6 addresses.
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Message 1065645 - Posted: 11 Jan 2011, 16:34:39 UTC - in response to Message 1065632.

When will cars switch themselves on and warm up with a click from a computer?


I can buy one now to work with a smart phone. It gets cold here, eh?

How long will IPv6 last???


That will be market driven. There are a zillion (another technical term) ways around the limits of addresses, already in use on distributed buses in mobile applications. The same thing happens there - somebody thinks up a bus standard with "way more addresses than anybody will ever need" (famous last words), and then the users saturate the addresses within a few months.

The cheap and nasty way around this is to create devices that are local bus controllers, with their own set of addresses below them. A typical message in ARINC/IEE/MIL-STD/Canbus today might look like:

{start block}{for address X}{instruction}{end block}

X is a device using the "standard" addressing system. It decodes "instruction" and figures out it is supposed to turn on/turn off/whatever sub-device X.1234. Depending on how much people are willing to pay, and how long your messages are allowed to be, you can overnight increase the number of bus addresses by a factor of 8, 16, 32, or whatever.

In my experience the Standards Development community is always a few months or years behind industry. When people need something, they make it. Standards come later.

There are enough web addresses for 667220327295957771496812 / square meter of surface area of the earth. That is 6* 10^23 / square meter or 2^63 / square meter. Or put another way, 2^31 times the entire number of web addresses under IPv4 / square meter.

Conclusion: We are going to have to colonize the rest of the solar system space before there is any chance at all of runing out of IPV6 addresses.

Just how many gates per square meter at the IC level?

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Message 1066589 - Posted: 14 Jan 2011, 16:57:47 UTC
Last modified: 14 Jan 2011, 16:58:35 UTC

Is it the facebook programme? The internet programme compatabilty with facebook?
Other applications compatability with facebook?

Then English invented the internet.

Some say that the Americans invented the internet.

It's true that each country has it's own main server interface.


It's true that the world is full of very important people.

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Message 1066656 - Posted: 14 Jan 2011, 19:23:52 UTC

People are still confused about the Internet and the World Wide Web, which are two separate things.

Difference

Tim Berners Lee invented the World Wide Web.

WWW

The Internet was not invented by any one person but evolved from the ARPANET in the 1960's.
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Message 1066687 - Posted: 14 Jan 2011, 20:45:52 UTC

That is true of me ... I am evolving in to an alcoholic with the 120 litres of single malt I must dispatch in the next 3 weeks.

I should be able to blow a 423 microgramme shot by the end of the week end.

Winning before then, as I put on another calorie driven 20 lbs. That on top of the 72 stone already there..
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Message 1066764 - Posted: 15 Jan 2011, 0:31:34 UTC

I can help with the single malt, if you like.
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Message 1066818 - Posted: 15 Jan 2011, 3:18:31 UTC
Last modified: 15 Jan 2011, 3:19:42 UTC

And on the Seventh day He rested. Then somebody just had to come along and create the World Wide Web/Internet. There goes the neighbourhood!

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