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Message 1367883 - Posted: 14 May 2013, 14:39:34 UTC

We've had Linux in space for a long time. This small example here however does carry more on the news headlines:


Penguins in spa-a-a-ce! ISS dumps Windows for Linux on laptops

'We needed an operating system that was stable and reliable'

The crew of the International Space Station (once they've fixed their leak) will trade their old Windows XP laptops for Debian-powered systems to use in their Operations Local Area Network (Ops LAN).

The six-person ISS has over 140 laptops on board, around 80 of which are working at any one time, along with a variety of internal networks for operations, crew support, and telemetry. These are used to manage on-board systems and handle some of the 50GB of data the ISS puts out and receives every week.

United Space Alliance (USA), the Earth-based contractor who maintains Ops LAN, has been using Windows XP laptops for the Ops LAN setup. However, with that operating system going into retirement – and prone to frequent crashes – laptops and network integration team leader Keith Chuvala decided it was time for a change.

"We migrated key functions from Windows to Linux because we needed an operating system that was stable and reliable – one that would give us in-house control. So if we needed to patch, adjust or adapt, we could," ...




IT is what very much what we make it...
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Message 1367966 - Posted: 14 May 2013, 22:20:09 UTC - in response to Message 1367883.
Last modified: 14 May 2013, 22:23:32 UTC

We've had Linux in space for a long time. This small example here however does carry more on the news headlines:


Penguins in spa-a-a-ce! ISS dumps Windows for Linux on laptops

'We needed an operating system that was stable and reliable'

The crew of the International Space Station ...

... has been using Windows XP laptops for the Ops LAN setup. However, with that operating system going into retirement – and prone to frequent crashes – laptops and network integration team leader Keith Chuvala decided it was time for a change.

"We migrated key functions from Windows to Linux because we needed an operating system that was stable and reliable – one that would give us in-house control. So if we needed to patch, adjust or adapt, we could," ...



And it's certainly hitting various headlines including the general run of the runt newspapers even! Just a few headlines are copied here. And then also... I wonder how long Linux has been in space...?


The Telegraph: International Space Station to boldly go with Linux over Windows

Computers aboard the International Space Station are to be switched from Windows XP to the Linux operating system in an attempt to improve stability and reliability.


Techworld: Linux replaces Windows XP on International Space Station laptops

Aging OS ejected from airlock

... With the ISS and its support services are now in an all-Linux state, the organisation plans to press ahead with another piece of Linux-driven technology, the Robonaut (R2), a robot-like humanoid designed to carry out activities outside the ISS considered too dangerous for crew.

“Things really clicked after we came to understand how Linux views the world, the interconnectedness of how one thing affects another. You need that worldview. I have quite a bit of Linux experience, but to see others who were really getting it, that was exciting,” concluded Chuvala.

In truth the chances of moving to a more recent version of Windows were always non-existent given the widespread use of Linux in the organisation. But incidents such as the embarrassing July 2008 malware infection that saw the W32.Gammima.AG worm infect an orbiting Windows laptop won't have helped Microsoft's cause.



Extremetech: International Space Station switches from Windows to Linux, for improved reliability

... we shouldn’t be too surprised at the ditching of Windows. Linux is the scientific community’s operating system of choice. CERN’s Large Hadron Collider is controlled by Linux. NASA and SpaceX ground stations use Linux. DNA-sequencing lab technicians use Linux. Really, for applications that require absolute stability, which most scientific experiments are, Linux is the obvious choice...


ZDNet: To the space station and beyond with Linux

... no other operating system is as flexible as Linux. From supercomputers to robots to desktops, NASA is finding that Linux is the answer.


1997: New Computer Operating System Rides Space Shuttle

A radically different new computer operating system is controlling an experiment on a Space Shuttle mission in late March...

... "Linux is the modern successor to the Unix operating system developed by Bell Labs during the 1970's"...



2005: Build Your Own Linux-Based Satellite

For $10 million, SpaceDev is offering a Linux-based microsatellite that can be controlled over the internet using any laptop or desktop computer...


2005: First Beowulf Cluster in Space

When a satellite's image-gathering power exceeds the bandwidth available to transmit the images, a Linux cluster right on the satellite helps decide which images to send back to Earth.


2011: Unix/Linux used in space exploration?

This is how I make my living these days. We are using Solaris but are migrating to Linux as fast as we can. We build launch vehicles and satellites...


2013: World's First Smartphone-Powered Satellite Launched Into Space

... Dubbed the world’s first “Phonesat”, the STRaND-1 carries a Google Nexus One, a new Linux-based high-speed CubeSat computer and attitude & orbit control system, and two propulsion systems. According to a joint press release issued by the SSC and SSTL,the 7.7-lb satellite will initially be controlled by the Linux-based CubeSat computer, with the Android-powered taking over the reigns of the nanosatellite’s in-orbit operations during the second phase of the mission. ...



Interesting good positive stuff! To boldly venture onwards!! :-)

IT is very much what we make it...
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Message 1368096 - Posted: 15 May 2013, 8:04:51 UTC

How much a month is Linus Torvald paying you to plug his system? No matter what you say Linux will never be on 90% of desktops and laptops in the world, however much you think it ought to be or should be. I bet you signed the petition to keep the tanner!



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Message 1368114 - Posted: 15 May 2013, 8:34:18 UTC - in response to Message 1368096.
Last modified: 15 May 2013, 8:35:05 UTC

How much a month is Linus Torvald paying you to plug his system? No matter what you say Linux will never be on 90% of desktops and laptops in the world, however much you think it ought to be or should be. I bet you signed the petition to keep the tanner!

I just use his system along with the work donated by Richard Stallman...

It also keeps me in business, and with great freedom for doing business, reliably.

And an ideal scenario would be to see Linux systems with no more than 20% of whichever market segment, equally sharing open standards with 4 other independent systems. Monopoly is bad for the users regardless of the system name behind whatever monopoly...


Monopoly also stifles progress... Hence why are we stuck with an awful lot of 32-bit software running on 64-bit hardware?... Over a decade later, still...

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Message 1368135 - Posted: 15 May 2013, 10:07:35 UTC

Monopoly also stifles progress...

Tend to agree in principle.

Hence why are we stuck with an awful lot of 32-bit software running on 64-bit hardware?... Over a decade later, still...

Because we are in a world recession, and software companies simply cannot afford to update old 32 bit software to 64 bit. All new software is automatically 64 bit. I have an excellent scanner with 35mm slides and film strip scanning capability, but there are no 64 bit drivers for my win 7 machine, so I cant use it. If I went out and bought a new scanner it would solve the problem. Sod them, I'll go without and keep my money in my pocket.

A minor irritation to me, cash flow problems for them. No point in flogging dead horses or lost causes. Linux has it's place as a specialised system for some applications, it will never become mainstream. People who bang the drum about it are in the same mould as JW's who bang on your door trying to convince the majority that their minority way is best. And it irritates the rest of us.

Oh and this isn't a personal pop so I'll add this :-))

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Message 1368920 - Posted: 17 May 2013, 14:36:13 UTC - in response to Message 1368135.
Last modified: 17 May 2013, 14:37:31 UTC

Because we are in a world recession, and software companies simply cannot afford to update old 32 bit software to 64 bit. All new software is automatically 64 bit.

Quite so and no problem if your OS is 64-bit. The only headache is to include 32-bit system libraries alongside the 64-bit libraries.

The problem is when you suffer a large base of 32-bit OSes that are not going to be updated any time soon due to licensing and cost lock-in. That dictates that new software is still stuck in 32-bits for the sake of dinosaur compatibility...

A great freedom with FLOSS is that usually you have the option to recompile to either of 64-bit or 32-bit however you choose. Most users never notice that because usually you always have available both 32 and 64 bit versions for no extra cost.


I have an excellent scanner with 35mm slides and film strip scanning capability, but there are no 64 bit drivers for my win 7 machine, so I cant use it. If I went out and bought a new scanner it would solve the problem. Sod them, I'll go without and keep my money in my pocket. ...

There's a standard (UHID?) USB interface standard whereby no special drivers are needed.

Is your scanner all ad-hoc proprietary non-standard for its interface?

At least most webcam manufacturers have now seen the light for using an agreed standard interface. That means you can use any number of different webcams or other imaging devices, all from the one driver. Makes the software and hardware interfacing very easy.


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Message 1368923 - Posted: 17 May 2013, 14:41:37 UTC - in response to Message 1367966.
Last modified: 17 May 2013, 14:42:36 UTC

We've had Linux in space for a long time. This small example here however does carry more on the news headlines:


Penguins in spa-a-a-ce! ISS dumps Windows for Linux on laptops

'We needed an operating system that was stable and reliable'

The crew of the International Space Station ...

... has been using Windows XP laptops for the Ops LAN setup. However, with that operating system going into retirement – and prone to frequent crashes – laptops and network integration team leader Keith Chuvala decided it was time for a change.

"We migrated key functions from Windows to Linux because we needed an operating system that was stable and reliable – one that would give us in-house control. So if we needed to patch, adjust or adapt, we could," ...



And it's certainly hitting various headlines including the general run of the runt newspapers even! Just a few headlines are copied here. And then also... I wonder how long Linux has been in space...?


The Telegraph: International Space Station to boldly go with Linux over Windows

Computers aboard the International Space Station are to be switched from Windows XP to the Linux operating system in an attempt to improve stability and reliability. ...


Unfortunately, that got over-hyped/sensationalised a little step too far into a giant leap...


More accurately and actually:

International Space Station incorporating more Linux computers [Updated]

Acer and Windows 8 may be all over the upcoming Star Trek Into Darkness movie, but Linux is actually the go-to platform on the International Space Station these days.

The United Space Alliance, which manages all of the space station’s computers in association with NASA, made the decision to migrate key functions from Windows to Linux, “because we needed an operating system that [is] stable and reliable,” Keith Chuvala of United Space Alliance said in a Linux Foundation press release. ...

... Most systems on the space station already use some form of Linux, including the Robonaut 2...

... [Update 5/10/13 9 p.m. EST: We heard from Kieth Chuvala below who said his comments with the Linux Foundation have been misconstrued. The ISS does use Linux as well as Windows, and has no plans to ditch Windows any time soon. ...]




Still interesting good positive stuff! To boldly venture onwards!! :-)

IT is very much what we make it...
Martin
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Message 1368943 - Posted: 17 May 2013, 15:08:25 UTC

A certain old company has been boasting of 'selling' 100 Million licenses, even though nothing like that many are newly on the streets yet for a certain new/respun OS.

Meanwhile, quietly and unobtrusively and really on the streets:


50 million Apache OpenOffice downloads in a year

Just a few days after the one year anniversary of the release of the first version of OpenOffice from the Apache Foundation (Apache OpenOffice 3.4) on 8 May 2012, the project can now boast 50 million downloads of the open source office suite. More than 80% of these downloads have come from Windows users, with the rest of the downloads spread between Mac OS X and Linux. Over time, the percentage of Windows users has slightly increased at the expense of Mac OS X, with Linux usage hovering steady under 5%. ...

Linux distributions do not account for a large percentage of Apache OpenOffice downloads because almost all major distributions currently ship with the LibreOffice fork. ... Nonetheless, 50 million downloads in one year is an impressive number, especially when taking into account that the last 10 million of those downloads happened since the beginning of March. In contrast, LibreOffice claimed it had 15 million unique downloads of its office suite in all of 2012.



Note that those numbers most likely do not include where OpenOffice or LibreOffice or any of a few other 'office' suits are part of a Linux distribution selection and so never need to be downloaded separately from the source sites.


IT is as freely open as we make it...
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Message 1370129 - Posted: 20 May 2013, 21:57:11 UTC
Last modified: 20 May 2013, 21:58:34 UTC

On a (super :-) ) distributed-computing-positive roll:

US boffin builds 32-way Raspberry Pi cluster

Beowulf cluster built for the price of a single PC

... University PhD candidate Joshua Kiepert has built a 32-way Beowulf cluster from Raspberry Pis.

Kiepert says his research focuses on “developing a novel data sharing system for wireless sensor networks ... Kipert figured he would need a decent simulator, preferably a cluster so he could simulate lots of distributed sensors. The University possesses just such a cluster, comprised of 32 nodes each packing a quad-core Intel Xeon E3-1225 CPU humming away at 3.1GHz.

That's a lovely facility and is therefore much in-demand, which meant Kiepert could not guarantee access for lengthy experiments. That got Kiepert thinking that if he had a cluster of his own he could tweak as required...

... Kiepert's now doing all his research on the cluster, writing in a lengthy (PDF) account of the build that “I have found performance perfectly acceptable for my simulation needs, and have had the luxury of customizing the cluster software to fit my requirements exactly.”

Custom software doesn't, however, mean faster performance: Kiepert admits performance of the cluster isn't stellar, even after he re-wrote simulation software for his cluster.

But the price was right: the PDF includes a bill of materials that includes cabling, lighting and even screws needed to assemble his acrylic racks. ...



In true FLOSS style, all the details are there for you too to share in the freedom! Excellent stuff!

IT is as freely open as we make it...
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Message 1376180 - Posted: 3 Jun 2013, 21:25:12 UTC

Last time I checked Android was Linux
http://www.latimes.com/business/technology/la-fi-tn-hackers-target-android-mobile-devices-20130603,0,4692792.story

Hackers are increasingly targeting Android devices
When they were listed on the Google Play store, Superclean and DroidCleaner appeared to be useful apps to free up wasted memory on mobile devices. But actually they were dangerous apps that could send an Android user’s text messages, contacts and photos to a hacker’s computer.


Get popular and you have as many holes as Windoze.

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Message 1376255 - Posted: 3 Jun 2013, 23:55:02 UTC - in response to Message 1376180.
Last modified: 4 Jun 2013, 0:02:07 UTC

Get popular and you have as many holes as Windoze.

Nope. Try again...

Look again at the exploits and numbers/proportions. As repeatedly explained against your random mud-slinging and troll baiting, no OS is invulnerable but you can make life at lot easier and safer for the users, by design.

Could that "by design" be why there is no need for firewalls and anti-virus for *nix style systems such as Android and Linux and even Apple?... Ohhh... Hold on a moment... No absolute numbers for your article and no comparisons... A little bit of scare-mongering by an Anti-virus company?...

Of far greater concern is the lack of privacy from Google... But that is for another thread.

And as for downloading apps to run... The same common sense against downloading a rogue app is required regardless of OS.


And then also, if you really wanted or you were really negligent enough, you can make ANY system as insecure as you might unwittingly not know about.

However, the people behind Linux and the people that make use of Linux for others tend to take better care than certain other Marketing compromised OSes... The design of Linux makes it easy to obtain high security.


And so for you latest prod... Getting a little bored with your view?

IT is very much what we make it...
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Message 1376280 - Posted: 4 Jun 2013, 0:47:38 UTC
Last modified: 4 Jun 2013, 0:48:48 UTC

An interesting twist and all FLOSS-ed:


A Slower Speed of Light

A Slower Speed of Light is a first-person game prototype in which players navigate a 3D space while picking up orbs that reduce the speed of light... Visual effects of special relativity gradually become apparent to the player, increasing the challenge of gameplay...


Spookily weird... Enjoy!

IT is what we make it,
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Message 1376352 - Posted: 4 Jun 2013, 5:08:46 UTC - in response to Message 1376255.

And as for downloading apps to run... The same common sense against downloading a rogue app is required regardless of OS.

So why would the store run by the company promoting the O/S have trojan apps for sale? (which supposedly will enrich them) Sounds about like something you would expect from M$.

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Message 1376499 - Posted: 4 Jun 2013, 12:00:16 UTC - in response to Message 1376352.

And as for downloading apps to run... The same common sense against downloading a rogue app is required regardless of OS.

So why would the store run by the company promoting the O/S have trojan apps for sale? (which supposedly will enrich them) Sounds about like something you would expect from M$.

Google actively check their store for 'rogue apps' and so far have caught the very few examples of malware quite quickly. Unfortunately, there is an awful lot of advertisement-ware scams on there...

However, note: Your article looks to be very much a scaremongering advertisement article sponsored by a Microsoft systems Anti-virus 3rd party hoping to break into a new market where there are no viruses! Hence the scare tactics to dupe new customers into something that they do not need and do not want.

Also note that you could claim that Google 'trojans' all your private data in any case... But that is for another thread.


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Message 1376500 - Posted: 4 Jun 2013, 12:03:21 UTC
Last modified: 4 Jun 2013, 12:03:43 UTC

And to continue with computer freedom made easy:


Introducing the New Out Of Box Software (NOOBS)

If you’re a beginner with a Raspberry Pi, things just got a whole lot easier.

We started this project with the premise that throwing people in at the deep end and making them jump hurdles, to mix my sporting metaphors, is a good way to get them to learn stuff. It is: but it can also put some people off, sometimes terminally. And we don’t want people to put their Raspberry Pi down in horror after five minutes. So with this in mind, we’d like to introduce you to NOOBS.

NOOBS is a way to make setting up a Raspberry Pi for the first time much, much easier. You won’t need network access, and you won’t need to download any special imaging software. Just head to the downloads page, grab a copy of the NOOBS zip file, and unpack it onto a freshly formatted 4GB (or larger) SD card. When you boot up for the first time, you’ll see a menu prompting you to install one of several operating systems into the free space on the card. The choice means you can boot the Pi with a regular operating system like Raspbian, or with a media-centre specific OS like RaspBMC.

Once you’ve installed an operating system, your Pi will boot as normal. However, NOOBS stays resident on your card, so by holding shift down during boot you can return to the recovery interface. This allows you to switch to a different operating system, or overwrite a corrupted card with a fresh install...



IT is what we make it...
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Message 1376514 - Posted: 4 Jun 2013, 12:42:49 UTC
Last modified: 4 Jun 2013, 12:43:55 UTC

I think there is a secret new OS that is being sneaked out behind our backs, it's called BOOBS. It goes tits up every time you try to use it.

Oh sorry, my mistake it's Windows 8 ....

IT is what we let them sell us. Bound for IT? No, just hands tied.

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Message 1376528 - Posted: 4 Jun 2013, 16:30:56 UTC - in response to Message 1376499.

Google actively check their store for 'rogue apps'

After they are on sale and made them some cash? Sounds like M$.

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Message 1377400 - Posted: 6 Jun 2013, 11:24:51 UTC

Funny thing with Linux.....

Format a 1TB drive on Windoze & you get 931GB.....

...Format the same drive on Linux & you get 914GB....

Think it should be Windows & Lindoze!
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Message 1377437 - Posted: 6 Jun 2013, 12:54:14 UTC - in response to Message 1377400.
Last modified: 6 Jun 2013, 13:09:13 UTC

Funny thing with Linux.....

Format a 1TB drive on Windoze & you get 931GB.....

...Format the same drive on Linux & you get 914GB....

Good you're taking a look.

But isn't that a rather trivial nit-pick in the realm of rounding errors? If you really want a filesystem with near zero space overhead, just simply use tar directly to the device (yes, you really can do that on Linux if you really want!).


Also to note:

Are those numbers (decimal) GBytes or (binary) GiBytes?
The same partitions?
Similarly featured filesystems?

For a flippant fob-off, you could easily claim that the Linux filesystem is using a bigger better filesystem journal for extra performance and better safety, hence the negligibly possibly smaller space available for user data.

Horses for courses? ;-)


Aside: My preference for Linux filesystems is to use ext4 for standard or critical use, and to use the bleeding-edge new btrfs for experimental or non-critical use. btrfs is shaping up nicely but beware that it is still under heavy development. Also with the great power of btrfs comes the great potential to confuse the hell out of you for the new features! Fantastic stuff :-)

(Contrast with NTFS... The Wikipedia article for btrfs seems to read a little negative until you realize just how much more is being included as part of btrfs as compared to all other filesystems...)

Enjoy your explorations!

IT is what we make it...
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Message 1377498 - Posted: 6 Jun 2013, 16:07:22 UTC - in response to Message 1377437.

Funny thing with Linux.....

Format a 1TB drive on Windoze & you get 931GB.....

...Format the same drive on Linux & you get 914GB....

Good you're taking a look.

But isn't that a rather trivial nit-pick in the realm of rounding errors? If you really want a filesystem with near zero space overhead, just simply use tar directly to the device (yes, you really can do that on Linux if you really want!).


Nope, not nit picking or looking either. I've said before I use all 3 of the poor defamed monkeys.

2x 1TB in my Windows systems gives 931GB each yet 2x 1TB on NAS box using Lindoze gives 914GB each - that's 34GB missing I could use for more TV shows & Films :(
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