Lunar impact live on NASA TV

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Message 938600 - Posted: 9 Oct 2009, 10:26:44 UTC

Watch the impact live on NASA TV:

NASA TV



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Message 938608 - Posted: 9 Oct 2009, 11:40:05 UTC - in response to Message 938600.  

Awesome :) just watched it. Totally worth staying up till after midnight to see ^^

I remember when I was 8 watching the Cassini-Huygens probe launch.. its coming back next year, hopefully lol
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Message 938609 - Posted: 9 Oct 2009, 11:48:30 UTC

Damned, i have missed it. Now i see only talking bla bla bla....
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Message 938610 - Posted: 9 Oct 2009, 12:25:15 UTC - in response to Message 938609.  

Damned, i have missed it. Now i see only talking bla bla bla....


Try this champ =)


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Message 938616 - Posted: 9 Oct 2009, 13:51:41 UTC
Last modified: 9 Oct 2009, 13:52:45 UTC

I watched it live on NASA TV but did not see any flash on impact. Instead the Apollo 14 rocket which was crashed on the Moon has produces a big crater now seen and photographed by the Moon Recon Orbiter. Maybe the Centaur rocket was less heavy than the big Apollo launcher.
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Message 938810 - Posted: 10 Oct 2009, 1:01:40 UTC
Last modified: 10 Oct 2009, 1:05:22 UTC

How´╗┐ deep were the impacts? Anybody know?

I can't saw a sign of a debris cloud.


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Message 938937 - Posted: 10 Oct 2009, 7:10:03 UTC - in response to Message 938810.  

What happened to the debris cloud?


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Message 938975 - Posted: 10 Oct 2009, 13:27:56 UTC

The scientists said the blast caused will be strong enough to fly the pieces of the lunar surface. Fragments will be observed from Earth through a telescope measuring 10 to 12 inches or greater than that. And this 'fly the pieces of lunar surface' we call it as the debris cloud.

As Master Tullio said, we did not see any flash on impact. Looks like nothing was happened in Cabeus crater.


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Message 938979 - Posted: 10 Oct 2009, 14:13:35 UTC - in response to Message 938610.  

Damned, i have missed it. Now i see only talking bla bla bla....


Try this champ =)




Thx for the link. :-)))
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Message 939167 - Posted: 11 Oct 2009, 14:13:38 UTC - in response to Message 938600.  

Was interesting until impact horizon, sort of expected a bigger "poof" or "plume" of a debris cloud - but having never witnessed a lunar impact by telescope, maybe that's all there is to it for low-speed high-mass objects.

Wonder why they picked that crater - plenty of others with sun-shadows and deep enough that would have been more visible - but I suppose it wasn't about public entertainment.

Am curious if someone can translate the last bits of verbal communications going on - the transition from 1hz to 1mhz, for example (cameras?)
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Message 939226 - Posted: 11 Oct 2009, 20:48:44 UTC

I believe they chose the crater they did because the strongest indications of possible water ice were from there. I've heard that 1 MegaHertz referred to the bandwidth of the signal. 1 Hertz apparently means one image sent per second. They were reportedly tinkering with the image rate so as to cope with unexpectedly large data files they were receiving, just before impact. In order to get all of the information in each image they would have had to compensate for larger than expected amounts of data, by slowing the rate at which the image was refreshed. Michael
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Message boards : Science (non-SETI) : Lunar impact live on NASA TV


 
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