Is There a "CPUZ" for Linux ??

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Message 763974 - Posted: 7 Jun 2008, 7:21:09 UTC

Or something similar, particularly the memory testing functions.

TIA
Brodo
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Message 764008 - Posted: 7 Jun 2008, 10:17:46 UTC - in response to Message 763974.  

Or something similar, particularly the memory testing functions.

TIA
Brodo

Geez.......that is a good question.....
Not being a Linux kitty, I do not have the answer, but I know that cpuz is invaluable to me in 'Doze........
Maybe someone needs to petition the cpuz folks for a Linux port........
Always remember.....kitties are all Angels with fur.

Have made friends in this life.
Most were cats.
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Message 764118 - Posted: 7 Jun 2008, 13:09:29 UTC - in response to Message 764008.  
Last modified: 7 Jun 2008, 13:11:39 UTC

Or something similar, particularly the memory testing functions.

... Maybe someone needs to petition the cpuz folks for a Linux port........

No need. It's already there, with lots lots more :-)

Instead of a "CPUZ", you have a directory (folders) tree that lists just about everything there is about the kernel and running processes. As root, you can change the values also (but obviously take care to make sure you know what you're doing!).

So:

From the command line, you can list the cpu details with:

(example for my old clunker)

# more /proc/cpuinfo
processor       : 0
vendor_id       : AuthenticAMD
cpu family      : 6
model           : 6
model name      : AMD Athlon(tm) XP 1800+
stepping        : 2
cpu MHz         : 1532.685
cache size      : 256 KB
fdiv_bug        : no
hlt_bug         : no
f00f_bug        : no
coma_bug        : no
fpu             : yes
fpu_exception   : yes
cpuid level     : 1
wp              : yes
flags           : fpu vme de pse tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic sep mtrr pge
  mca cmov pat pse36 mmx fxsr sse syscall mp mmxext 3dnowext 3dnow
bogomips        : 3067.39


Similarly so for memory, use:
# more /proc/meminfo

(If those two commands don't work, then you need to be part of the "adm" group or you may have a locked-down system and you need to be root.)


And then there's various GUIs that show that information in various pretty ways. Some examples are: KSysGuard, Ksensors, Gkrellm, and whatever else you might find under system monitoring.

And then there's Memtest86+ for offline testing and then also an equivalent that can run whilst you're using your system.


And I'm sure there's various utilities to give a pretty-print of your system specs.

Happy crunchin',
Martin
See new freedom: Mageia5
See & try out for yourself: Linux Voice
The Future is what We all make IT (GPLv3)
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Message 764220 - Posted: 7 Jun 2008, 16:34:39 UTC - in response to Message 764118.  

Or something similar, particularly the memory testing functions.

... Maybe someone needs to petition the cpuz folks for a Linux port........

No need. It's already there, with lots lots more :-)

Instead of a "CPUZ", you have a directory (folders) tree that lists just about everything there is about the kernel and running processes. As root, you can change the values also (but obviously take care to make sure you know what you're doing!).

So:

From the command line, you can list the cpu details with:

(example for my old clunker)

# more /proc/cpuinfo
processor       : 0
vendor_id       : AuthenticAMD
cpu family      : 6
model           : 6
model name      : AMD Athlon(tm) XP 1800+
stepping        : 2
cpu MHz         : 1532.685
cache size      : 256 KB
fdiv_bug        : no
hlt_bug         : no
f00f_bug        : no
coma_bug        : no
fpu             : yes
fpu_exception   : yes
cpuid level     : 1
wp              : yes
flags           : fpu vme de pse tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic sep mtrr pge
  mca cmov pat pse36 mmx fxsr sse syscall mp mmxext 3dnowext 3dnow
bogomips        : 3067.39


Similarly so for memory, use:
# more /proc/meminfo

(If those two commands don't work, then you need to be part of the "adm" group or you may have a locked-down system and you need to be root.)


And then there's various GUIs that show that information in various pretty ways. Some examples are: KSysGuard, Ksensors, Gkrellm, and whatever else you might find under system monitoring.

And then there's Memtest86+ for offline testing and then also an equivalent that can run whilst you're using your system.


And I'm sure there's various utilities to give a pretty-print of your system specs.

Happy crunchin',
Martin



Thanks for reminding me why I use windows.
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Message 764278 - Posted: 7 Jun 2008, 17:40:49 UTC - in response to Message 764220.  
Last modified: 7 Jun 2008, 17:52:28 UTC

[...]
And then there's various GUIs that show that information in various pretty ways. Some examples are: KSysGuard, Ksensors, Gkrellm, and whatever else you might find under system monitoring.

And then there's Memtest86+ for offline testing and then also an equivalent that can run whilst you're using your system.


And I'm sure there's various utilities to give a pretty-print of your system specs.

Happy crunchin',
Martin

Thanks for reminding me why I use windows.

[Silly return jibe]
Sheesh... Is that because Windows is designed for those whom can't read nor comprehend?
[/Silly return jibe]

For those whom can only see 'graphical', please see this pretty picture (from long ago) and note the panels on the left.

Or is all that choice too much for you to handle? I'll make the note that it's merely a question of what you want to see. The raw data is immediately there. You can dress it up with whatever GUI you wish, easily.

Now can we get off the "Windoz Rules" vs "Everything Else" silliness?

Thank you,
Martin

GUI: GRAPHICAL User Interface
See new freedom: Mageia5
See & try out for yourself: Linux Voice
The Future is what We all make IT (GPLv3)
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Message 764284 - Posted: 7 Jun 2008, 17:51:38 UTC

There is also "cpuinfo" that gives a 'pretty print' of the CPU details if you want something a little nicer than the kernel /proc/cpuinfo format.

I would guess that's the nearest to CPUZ for CPU info.

Happy crunchin',
Martin

See new freedom: Mageia5
See & try out for yourself: Linux Voice
The Future is what We all make IT (GPLv3)
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Message 764497 - Posted: 8 Jun 2008, 0:17:31 UTC

On SuSE Linux 10.3 I use "hwinfo --cpu" as root.
Tullio
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Message 764801 - Posted: 8 Jun 2008, 15:14:20 UTC

Hardware Lister (lshw)
lshw (Hardware Lister) is a small tool to provide detailed information on the hardware configuration of the machine. It can report exact memory configuration, firmware version, mainboard configuration, CPU version and speed, cache configuration, bus speed, etc. on DMI-capable x86 or EFI (IA-64) systems and on some PowerPC machines (PowerMac G4 is known to work).
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Message 764900 - Posted: 8 Jun 2008, 19:18:50 UTC - in response to Message 764801.  

Hardware Lister (lshw)
lshw (Hardware Lister) is a small tool to provide detailed information on the hardware configuration of the machine. It can report exact memory configuration, firmware version, mainboard configuration, CPU version and speed, cache configuration, bus speed, etc. on DMI-capable x86 or EFI (IA-64) systems and on some PowerPC machines (PowerMac G4 is known to work).

I compiled it in my SuSE Linux 10.3 and it works in both CLI and GUI versions.
Tullio
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Message 764917 - Posted: 8 Jun 2008, 19:47:37 UTC - in response to Message 764278.  

[...]
And then there's various GUIs that show that information in various pretty ways. Some examples are: KSysGuard, Ksensors, Gkrellm, and whatever else you might find under system monitoring.

And then there's Memtest86+ for offline testing and then also an equivalent that can run whilst you're using your system.


And I'm sure there's various utilities to give a pretty-print of your system specs.

Happy crunchin',
Martin

Thanks for reminding me why I use windows.

[Silly return jibe]
Sheesh... Is that because Windows is designed for those whom can't read nor comprehend?
[/Silly return jibe]

For those whom can only see 'graphical', please see this pretty picture (from long ago) and note the panels on the left.

Or is all that choice too much for you to handle? I'll make the note that it's merely a question of what you want to see. The raw data is immediately there. You can dress it up with whatever GUI you wish, easily.

Now can we get off the "Windoz Rules" vs "Everything Else" silliness?

Thank you,
Martin

GUI: GRAPHICAL User Interface


Close. It's basically because I am too lazy.

ID: 764917 · Report as offensive

Message boards : Number crunching : Is There a "CPUZ" for Linux ??


 
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