The permian Extinction Event the smoking gun


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Message boards : Science (non-SETI) : The permian Extinction Event the smoking gun

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Larry Monske
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Message 737678 - Posted: 12 Apr 2008, 4:53:37 UTC

I wanted to know if someone can help me with something Ive found. I was doing a follow up on an impact study being done off western Austrailia. I googled a topographical map the one I chose when expanded a immense crater pattern appeared. The image was from JPL. If this is a crater it is the biggest on earth. This crater is centered NW of Alice Springs in a a town called Alara. This is the central uplifted area. I photoshoped the map and outlined the concentric rings that expand east and west from central Austailia and form the Austrailias highlands east and west across the continent. If this is a crater its a thousand miles across or more. Its so immense that it could only be seen from space. The crater rings are distinct and still visible in different images of Austrailia from space. Its immense size could be the reason no one has related to the permian extinction or the "Great Dying" of the Permian Epoch. How can I share this with someone who knows about impact studies.

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Message 739200 - Posted: 15 Apr 2008, 1:12:36 UTC

I suspect you’re seeing the results of the “Alice Springs orogeny”: through much of the Palaeozoic an ancient marine basin was being thrust upward in that region, and eroded remnants of the sediments around its margin form concentric patterns.
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Message 739914 - Posted: 16 Apr 2008, 18:11:36 UTC

It seems like that in the last 250,000,000 years the continents would have shifted so much as to have obliterated big meteor craters.
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Message 740141 - Posted: 16 Apr 2008, 23:02:54 UTC - in response to Message 739914.

It seems like that in the last 250,000,000 years the continents would have shifted so much as to have obliterated big meteor craters.

This crater is dead center in austrailia it looks like a very large impact I just wish I could include the images here so you could see.

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Message 740186 - Posted: 17 Apr 2008, 0:22:42 UTC

Nice article on impact craters.

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Message 740325 - Posted: 17 Apr 2008, 8:09:32 UTC - in response to Message 739914.

It seems like that in the last 250,000,000 years the continents would have shifted so much as to have obliterated big meteor craters.

Doubtless that has happened in many cases; there are also a number of impact sites that don’t show on the surface, being known only from detailed mineralogical and stratigraphic analyses of the affected region. There are several ancient craters preserved in Archaean shield bedrock; such formations are the ‘foundations’ of the continents, buried under deep sediments in many areas but occasionally exposed by glaciers and other causes of erosion. The hundred-kilometre-wide Manicouagan crater in Québec is some two hundred million years old but still quite obvious (that the rim is full of water, like a moat, helps to locate it in an atlas); the 250-km Sudbury crater can’t be spotted that way, but it’s thought to be nearly two billion years old. There’s one in South Africa that’s yet a little larger and older, while there are smaller ones of similar age in Australia and Finland.
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Message 740379 - Posted: 17 Apr 2008, 12:15:01 UTC

What is common with crater like regions is water has eroded the bedrock {stone type of the region}. Many oceans, seas and lakes have dissappeared with differing climate conditions. You may accomplish the knowledge you seek with oceanography research.

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Message 740509 - Posted: 17 Apr 2008, 18:10:15 UTC

Maybe the plates of Earth's crust don't break up that much, they just slip by each other. Maybe that would preserve some crater rims.
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Message 740752 - Posted: 18 Apr 2008, 4:46:59 UTC - in response to Message 740509.

Maybe the plates of Earth's crust don't break up that much, they just slip by each other. Maybe that would preserve some crater rims.


Tectonic movement in this continent its on the Austrailian plate so it moves along with the plate. There is subduction type fault that goes for couple hundred miles. Its in the straight line almost all the way across. The center of this area Ayers Rock, Ylara and Alice Spring a bit to SE. On the ring structures west is diamond mines and rarest type of carbon called light carbon. This structure is 265 million years old or possibly older. There also is a younger crater there cant recall the the name. This also would make a clean slate for life on Austrailia so its life is distinct and different than anywhere else.

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Message 750398 - Posted: 9 May 2008, 13:49:08 UTC - in response to Message 740752.

Maybe the plates of Earth's crust don't break up that much, they just slip by each other. Maybe that would preserve some crater rims.
anywhere else.
I recieved a reply from Adraina Campos head of Planetary Sciences from JPL. She finds the images intriging playing with the image on photoshop and playing with contrasts and color makes the ring pattern even more visible. After doing this a second crater overlaping the larger one it is in SW quadrant of the continent. Im still waiting for a Luanne Barker to reply she is doing an impact study off Austrailias west coast. Im excited about it, wonder if I can name it?

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Message 750707 - Posted: 9 May 2008, 23:58:55 UTC

Larry, you forwarded the images to JPL; may we see them, too? :-)

Larry Monske
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Message 752540 - Posted: 13 May 2008, 13:52:09 UTC - in response to Message 752539.

Larry, you forwarded the images to JPL; may we see them, too? :-)


How do I attach a link to this blog

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Message 753242 - Posted: 14 May 2008, 19:49:00 UTC - in response to Message 752540.

Larry, you forwarded the images to JPL; may we see them, too? :-)


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Leave out spaces in something such as [u r l]http://www.this.is.my.blog.vogonsphere.com[/ u r l].
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Message 753260 - Posted: 14 May 2008, 20:10:01 UTC - in response to Message 752540.
Last modified: 14 May 2008, 20:10:38 UTC

Larry, you forwarded the images to JPL; may we see them, too? :-)


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try this: [img] place the IMAGE URL here [/img]
IF you are going to post images @ all ;)
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Message 760842 - Posted: 30 May 2008, 21:07:25 UTC - in response to Message 737678.

I wanted to know if someone can help me with something Ive found. I was doing a follow up on an impact study being done off western Austrailia. I googled a topographical map the one I chose when expanded a immense crater pattern appeared. The image was from JPL. If this is a crater it is the biggest on earth. This crater is centered NW of Alice Springs in a a town called Alara. This is the central uplifted area. I photoshoped the map and outlined the concentric rings that expand east and west from central Austailia and form the Austrailias highlands east and west across the continent. If this is a crater its a thousand miles across or more. Its so immense that it could only be seen from space. The crater rings are distinct and still visible in different images of Austrailia from space. Its immense size could be the reason no one has related to the permian extinction or the "Great Dying" of the Permian Epoch. How can I share this with someone who knows about impact studies.


The Siberian Traps is the prime suspect in wiping out 90 percent of all living species 251 million years ago — the most severe extinction event in Earth's history.

The lava flows lasted for thousands of years and left deposits of basaltic lava thousands of feet thick over an area the size of the lower 48 states of the United States.

Similar flows, though not as thick nor covering such a large area can be found in the United States in New Mexico near Grants along I-40, and in Idaho along I-15 near the town of Blackfoot.

Unlike the standard volcanic flows, these originate from fissures in the earth's crust.

When you consider that these areas in the United States are noted for hydrothermal activity, it is not a stretch to suspect that they are not completely dormant.

While a single blast from a Yellowstone, Long Valley California or Valles caldera in New Mexico (Yep, that is right, the United States could not be satisfied with one super volcano, we went and got two more) would make an impact on the world climate, economy, and possibly population.... Prolonged lava flows from these fissures around the world would make a rather large mess of things.

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Message 760860 - Posted: 30 May 2008, 21:31:25 UTC - in response to Message 760842.

This isn't the only cuplrit for the Permian extinction event. Hydrogen Sulphide is thought to have been released from the oceans from decaying marine life, caused by the shut down of major oceanic currents and subsequent anoxia. This would have had a negative impact on land life too as the air would be toxic. Has anyone else heard of this?



I wanted to know if someone can help me with something Ive found. I was doing a follow up on an impact study being done off western Austrailia. I googled a topographical map the one I chose when expanded a immense crater pattern appeared. The image was from JPL. If this is a crater it is the biggest on earth. This crater is centered NW of Alice Springs in a a town called Alara. This is the central uplifted area. I photoshoped the map and outlined the concentric rings that expand east and west from central Austailia and form the Austrailias highlands east and west across the continent. If this is a crater its a thousand miles across or more. Its so immense that it could only be seen from space. The crater rings are distinct and still visible in different images of Austrailia from space. Its immense size could be the reason no one has related to the permian extinction or the "Great Dying" of the Permian Epoch. How can I share this with someone who knows about impact studies.


The Siberian Traps is the prime suspect in wiping out 90 percent of all living species 251 million years ago — the most severe extinction event in Earth's history.

The lava flows lasted for thousands of years and left deposits of basaltic lava thousands of feet thick over an area the size of the lower 48 states of the United States.

Similar flows, though not as thick nor covering such a large area can be found in the United States in New Mexico near Grants along I-40, and in Idaho along I-15 near the town of Blackfoot.

Unlike the standard volcanic flows, these originate from fissures in the earth's crust.

When you consider that these areas in the United States are noted for hydrothermal activity, it is not a stretch to suspect that they are not completely dormant.

While a single blast from a Yellowstone, Long Valley California or Valles caldera in New Mexico (Yep, that is right, the United States could not be satisfied with one super volcano, we went and got two more) would make an impact on the world climate, economy, and possibly population.... Prolonged lava flows from these fissures around the world would make a rather large mess of things.


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Message 761163 - Posted: 31 May 2008, 4:49:30 UTC - in response to Message 760860.

This isn't the only cuplrit for the Permian extinction event. Hydrogen Sulphide is thought to have been released from the oceans from decaying marine life, caused by the shut down of major oceanic currents and subsequent anoxia. This would have had a negative impact on land life too as the air would be toxic. Has anyone else heard of this?



I wanted to know if someone can help me with something Ive found. I was doing a follow up on an impact study being done off western Austrailia. I googled a topographical map the one I chose when expanded a immense crater pattern appeared. The image was from JPL. If this is a crater it is the biggest on earth. This crater is centered NW of Alice Springs in a a town called Alara. This is the central uplifted area. I photoshoped the map and outlined the concentric rings that expand east and west from central Austailia and form the Austrailias highlands east and west across the continent. If this is a crater its a thousand miles across or more. Its so immense that it could only be seen from space. The crater rings are distinct and still visible in different images of Austrailia from space. Its immense size could be the reason no one has related to the permian extinction or the "Great Dying" of the Permian Epoch. How can I share this with someone who knows about impact studies.


The Siberian Traps is the prime suspect in wiping out 90 percent of all living species 251 million years ago — the most severe extinction event in Earth's history.

The lava flows lasted for thousands of years and left deposits of basaltic lava thousands of feet thick over an area the size of the lower 48 states of the United States.

Similar flows, though not as thick nor covering such a large area can be found in the United States in New Mexico near Grants along I-40, and in Idaho along I-15 near the town of Blackfoot.

Unlike the standard volcanic flows, these originate from fissures in the earth's crust.

When you consider that these areas in the United States are noted for hydrothermal activity, it is not a stretch to suspect that they are not completely dormant.

While a single blast from a Yellowstone, Long Valley California or Valles caldera in New Mexico (Yep, that is right, the United States could not be satisfied with one super volcano, we went and got two more) would make an impact on the world climate, economy, and possibly population.... Prolonged lava flows from these fissures around the world would make a rather large mess of things.




Actually, the Hydrogen Sulphide release would have been a direct result of the continued lava flows. Over a period of time, remember, these flows lasted for thousands of years, the impact would have been catastrophic to the ecosphere. Initially, lowered solar heat reaching the surface would have resulted in a small ice age, however, the prolonged eruption and flows would have eventually began heating up the atmosphere, lowering the oxygen content, which would have impacted algae growth, which led to the die off of marine life, resulting in the poisoning of the atmosphere.

In truth, there is no smoking gun to the Permian extinction event, it was a domino effect in which one event impacted one part of the ecosystem which in turn impacted another.

Since the revised opinion of volcanic systems is that there are no truly extinct volcano, or volcanic fissure system, it is well within the possibility that any of these events could occur again. This theory of no extinct volcanic systems actually came about in the mid 70's after volcanic activity was discovered near a fissure complex that showed no activity for close to a million years. Within a matter of months, hydrothermal activity began to be noticed, along with seismic events, analysis of the region indicated a magma chamber at a relatively shallow depth.

The present theory suggests that volcanic systems are opened and closed by tectonic activity.

However, the presence of a magma chamber does not mean an event is likely, just possible. Kinda like the invention of refrigeration did not mean that the British would give up drinking warm beer, just that the possibility of doing so was possible.

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