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Science_Jane
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Message 735634 - Posted: 7 Apr 2008, 2:26:37 UTC

The USA and its' space partners* are building a satellite so huge that they theorize they will be able to see the beginning of our Universe. If they can do such a thing then shouldn't we also be able to see all the other evolutionary steps our solar system took to get to its' present position? In the future will man be able to see his/her very evolution unfold, just as easily as he/her pulls up a satellite map of the World on the web? Is it possible...there is really only 1 Sun...our Sun...and the twinkles in the night sky are the steps our Sun took to get to the present position as it drifts through the void of space? Is our 'so called' small Solar System TRULY the entire Universe?

The Stars in the night sky are a record of what those Stars looked like millions of years ago, meaning you are looking at what the Universe looked like millions of years ago. Our solar system travels through a void...moving from one place to another...which explains why we see SO many stars in the nights sky. If man where able to travel to the source of the twinkles in the sky...he literally would be traveling back in time. But if that is true...he would want to come back home, which means he could travel back to the future through the same route....which literally means Time Travel is possible! Although, you would have to construct a vehicle which could travel at the speed of light to do so...or faster! However, with new technologies such as the JWST we may be able to observe the past...like watching a re-run on TV.

Thank you for your time and interest...Science_Jane

*Hubble's successor - The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Follow links below:
--BBC Site...
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/6645179.stm
--NASA Site...
http://www.nasa.gov/vision/universe/watchtheskies/jwst_model.html
____________

Taurus
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Message 735801 - Posted: 7 Apr 2008, 15:27:12 UTC - in response to Message 735634.
Last modified: 7 Apr 2008, 15:37:08 UTC

If they can do such a thing then shouldn't we also be able to see all the other evolutionary steps our solar system took to get to its' present position?


Not our solar system, but we can already see a variety of star systems in various stages of evolution.

In the future will man be able to see his/her very evolution unfold, just as easily as he/her pulls up a satellite map of the World on the web?


There is no known mechanism based on a solid theoretical framework that would function to facilitate such a thing.

Is it possible...there is really only 1 Sun...our Sun...and the twinkles in the night sky are the steps our Sun took to get to the present position as it drifts through the void of space?


No, it's not possible. You forgot that the speed of light is constant and known with certainty and results in consistent calculations regarding the distances of other stars, nebulae, objects, etc.

You also forgot that not every star we see is the same kind of star or even necessarily remotely similar to each other.

The are Sun-like Stars, Super Novae, Brown Dwarfs, White Dwarfs, Neutron Stars, Pulsars, Magnetars, RRATs, Binary Star systems, the newly discovered "Peanut" shaped dual-Stars, and that's only to name a few.

There are between 200-600 billion stars in our galaxy alone, and there billions of observable galaxies of various shapes, sizes, conditions, and circumstances which vary dramatically, each with billions of stars as well.

The Stars in the night sky are a record of what those Stars looked like millions of years ago


Again, you're forgetting about the speed of light.
The Alpha Centauri system (which consists of three separate stars) is 4.22 light years away from us. That means when we look at Alpha Centauri, we're seeing what it looked like about ~4 years ago.

Since the Milky Way Galaxy has a diameter of ~100,000 light years, we are seeing stars at the edge of our galaxy as they were no more than 100,000 years ago.

Our solar system travels through a void...moving from one place to another...which explains why we see SO many stars in the nights sky.


Our solar system isn't in a void.
Our Sun, along with the star systems Alpha Centauri, Vega, Arcturus, and Fomalhaut is in a "small" (30 light years across) cloud of gas called the "Local Interstellar Cloud" or the "Local Fluff"; this cloud in turn exists inside a cavity called the "Local Bubble". This bubble in turn exists in one of the arms of the Milky Way Galaxy's spiral called the "Orion Arm".

If man where able to travel to the source of the twinkles in the sky...he literally would be traveling back in time.


No he wouldn't, he would be traveling forward in time, just like everything else; heck, you're traveling forward in time right now just as you sit there and read this!

I don't know where you got the idea that traveling to another star = going back in time.

When we look at the sun we see it as it was ~8 minutes ago because of its distance from the Earth. Yet the probes that we send to monitor it are not going 8 minutes into the past. Why would they be?

We've sent probes as far as the edges of our star system, vastly further away than the sun is from Earth; those probes are not going back in time any more than Buzz Aldrin went back in time when he traveled to the moon.

But if that is true...he would want to come back home, which means he could travel back to the future through the same route....which literally means Time Travel is possible! Although, you would have to construct a vehicle which could travel at the speed of light to do so...or faster!


The situation you described, someone traveling to a star and back again at the speed of light actually results in the complete opposite effect:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twin_paradox

Reinaerd
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Message 737320 - Posted: 11 Apr 2008, 11:37:41 UTC

Well that's definitely an original take on exploring our past. The only way that I see a possibility of capturing the visions of past evolutionary steps on our own planets (or within our own solar-system, if you wish) would be trough reflections and reverberations of events originating in our solar-system coming back to us after having traveled through space.
There is no saying how useful such observations would be or if they would be even recognized as such even if they would stand out in space's background clutter. It's (IMHO) not likely that we'd be able to devine crisp and clear observations of Australopithecines happily traipsing through the savanna or a clutch of Diplodocusses (or is it Diplodocii, I forgot) placidly munching away on a particularly juicy patch or ferns. Otoh, a major impact of a meteor or a particularly bright period of solar-activity just might show up.
I would have to observe that these reflections, when picked up, should be seen as astronomical forensics, much like markers on a timeline.
Interesting though, Thank you!

Profile Norman Copeland
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Message 738055 - Posted: 12 Apr 2008, 21:19:40 UTC - in response to Message 737320.
Last modified: 12 Apr 2008, 21:43:29 UTC

Well that's definitely an original take on exploring our past. The only way that I see a possibility of capturing the visions of past evolutionary steps on our own planets (or within our own solar-system, if you wish) would be trough reflections and reverberations of events originating in our solar-system coming back to us after having traveled through space.
There is no saying how useful such observations would be or if they would be even recognized as such even if they would stand out in space's background clutter. It's (IMHO) not likely that we'd be able to devine crisp and clear observations of Australopithecines happily traipsing through the savanna or a clutch of Diplodocusses (or is it Diplodocii, I forgot) placidly munching away on a particularly juicy patch or ferns. Otoh, a major impact of a meteor or a particularly bright period of solar-activity just might show up.
I would have to observe that these reflections, when picked up, should be seen as astronomical forensics, much like markers on a timeline.
Interesting though, Thank you!



Reinhaerd,


''There is no saying how useful such observations would be''

{me} Thats why we're not saying it.

''or if they would be even recognized as such even if they would stand out in space's background clutter''

{me} Thats why modern technology could offer new scientific research opportunities and we encourage the development of such concepts. The application of the science fiction institution is another progenitor of development.

''It's (IMHO) not likely that we'd be able to devine crisp and clear observations of Australopithecines happily traipsing through the savanna or a clutch of Diplodocusses (or is it Diplodocii, I forgot) placidly munching away on a particularly juicy patch or ferns''.

{me} Its not probable you will be {Hollywood is much more advanced than the rest of the world ''Jurassic park''}.

Think about your response, it was introverted and narrow and not condusive to scientific debate.

candorchasmaProject donor
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Message 738069 - Posted: 12 Apr 2008, 22:00:58 UTC

Hey Norm,

Everything Reinhaerd said was as germane to this discussion as anything you have said, and he was polite and did not insult you.

Reinaerd
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Message 738070 - Posted: 12 Apr 2008, 22:06:23 UTC - in response to Message 738069.

Hey Norm,

Everything Reinhaerd said was as germane to this discussion as anything you have said, and he was polite and did not insult you.


Thanks! That was truly appreciated.
Reinaerd

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