SETI@home in the News

Message boards : SETI@home Science : SETI@home in the News
Message board moderation

To post messages, you must log in.

Previous · 1 . . . 5 · 6 · 7 · 8

AuthorMessage
Profile Julie
Volunteer moderator
Volunteer tester
Avatar

Send message
Joined: 28 Oct 09
Posts: 33496
Credit: 12,349,170
RAC: 10,727
Belgium
Message 1784426 - Posted: 3 May 2016, 6:04:04 UTC - in response to Message 1783849.  
Last modified: 3 May 2016, 6:09:03 UTC

http://news.discovery.com/space/the-universe-likely-has-many-extinct-civilizations-study-160429.htm
Our civilization is 10,000 years old; unless a typical civilization lasts much longer, over the 13-billion-year lifespan of the universe it’s likely the others have gone extinct, the researchers added. But there is a practical application to keep us around longer, the researchers said.

“Our results imply that our evolution has not been unique and has probably happened many times before,” Frank said. “The other cases are likely to include many energy-intensive civilizations dealing with their feedback onto their planets as their civilizations grow. That means we can begin exploring the problem using simulations to get a sense of what leads to long lived civilizations and what doesn’t.”


Full paper http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/pdfplus/10.1089/ast.2015.1418


From the paper:

Is to create a sustainable, energy-intensive, high technology
civilization here on Earth



All my hopes are on nuclear fusion if we were once to meet our galactic neighbours.
rOZZ
Music
Pictures
ID: 1784426 · Report as offensive     Reply Quote
Profile William Rothamel
Avatar

Send message
Joined: 25 Oct 06
Posts: 3335
Credit: 1,322,163
RAC: 0
United States
Message 1784459 - Posted: 3 May 2016, 8:43:02 UTC - in response to Message 1027710.  

Drivel and Pap for the masses.

We have plenty of sentient species here on Earth and have communicated with them very sparsely and in a
somewhat primitive way.
ID: 1784459 · Report as offensive     Reply Quote
Profile Tiers Jean-Francois
Avatar

Send message
Joined: 3 Sep 00
Posts: 26
Credit: 514,827
RAC: 0
France
Message 1802073 - Posted: 11 Jul 2016, 12:57:38 UTC

Hello all.

Maybe it's not the best place to post this message. Sorry...

I read the article explaining the need to get Arecibo still working and I fully agree.
But, as we all know, the probability to make us sure that extraterrestrial intelligence exits (and to prove it to others) is quite poor and we all know the reasons.

If I joined SETI decades ago it is because I am personnally convinced that intelligence is not "the" specifity of our Earth.
But now, I think that SETI should slightly change his message towards the politicians and funders : why not to insist much more on the usefulness of searching for extraterrestrial LIFE, even not intelligent ?
I suppose this could add more weight in the negociations for at least one reason : many of the scientists (all fields gathered) are not enough convinced that intelligence exists out of Earth. Then, they do not push the project as its image is today (maybe sometimes afraid that the money put in SETI could affect their own field of research ?). But I guess that most of them agree that life must exist somewhere for statistical reasons (enhanced by the number of exoplanets that are being discovered almost monthly now, and considering that life could exist in other places than Earth-like planets).

I discussed recently whith some of my colleagues and I realized that globally they consider SETI as a very nice (worse : a bit funny) group of Science-Fiction dreamers.
In those times where Science budgets are drastically reduced in most of the countries, it becomes harder and harder to get founds.

Changing our image by changing slightly our message would not necessarily save Arecibo, but at least, it could help saving SETI... (a kind of SETIL ???)

Waiting for your opinions and sorry if I hurted some : it was absolutely not my goal (just sharing a concern that spins in my mind).

JF
Life is a sexually transmitted fatal disease(E.Bellamy)
ID: 1802073 · Report as offensive     Reply Quote
Profile tullioProject Donor
Volunteer moderator
Volunteer tester

Send message
Joined: 9 Apr 04
Posts: 6296
Credit: 1,679,709
RAC: 1,553
Italy
Message 1802083 - Posted: 11 Jul 2016, 13:54:44 UTC
Last modified: 11 Jul 2016, 13:57:49 UTC

On the register.co.uk site there is an article that points to an article by Nathalie Cabrol of the SETI Institute in "Astrobiology" that pleads for a new way to approach SETI not limiting it to search in the radio and optical bands. The article is long and scholarly. I tried to read it but I am not in the mood, for personal health reasons. However, I could not find any practical solution proposed. No mention is made of SETI@home, as usual.
Tullio
ID: 1802083 · Report as offensive     Reply Quote
Profile Julie
Volunteer moderator
Volunteer tester
Avatar

Send message
Joined: 28 Oct 09
Posts: 33496
Credit: 12,349,170
RAC: 10,727
Belgium
Message 1816371 - Posted: 11 Sep 2016, 12:48:25 UTC - in response to Message 1140514.  

SETI's Search For Aliens In The Universe Boosted By Donations

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. -- An array of 42 radio telescopes seeking signs of intelligent life in the universe will continue that work after private donors raised enough money to keep them going.

Here's the link for the rest of the article...
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/08/13/setis-search-aliens-seti_n_926121.html[/b]


Very good news!!
rOZZ
Music
Pictures
ID: 1816371 · Report as offensive     Reply Quote
Profile LynnProject Donor
Volunteer tester
Avatar

Send message
Joined: 20 Nov 00
Posts: 11831
Credit: 31,840,551
RAC: 31,852
United States
Message 1824728 - Posted: 16 Oct 2016, 18:51:34 UTC - in response to Message 1816371.  

In the news.


Breakthrough Listen Project will follow up on possible Alien laser beacon detections but think it is most likely instrument or analysis error


It is too early to unequivocally attribute these purported signals to the activities of extraterrestrial civilizations. Internationally agreed-upon protocols for searches for evidence of advanced life beyond Earth (SETI) require candidates to be confirmed by independent groups using their own telescopes, and for all natural explanations to be exhausted before invoking extraterrestrial agents as an explanation. Careful work must be undertaken to determine false positive rates, to rule out natural and instrumental explanations, and most importantly, to confirm detections using two or more independent telescopes.

Peaks in Fourier analysis of stellar spectra, such as those discussed by Borra and Trottier, can be caused by instrumental optics or introduced during data reduction. Data artifacts, fringing, and inconsistencies in the manufacture of detectors are known to users of high resolution spectrographs to cause minute patterns to appear in the resulting spectra. The movement of the telescope, variations in observing conditions, and the process of wavelength calibration can easily introduce undesired signals at levels that are only barely detectable. It is therefore important to check the claimed signal using a different telescope and instrument.

ET Phone Home
ID: 1824728 · Report as offensive     Reply Quote
Dr Who Fan
Volunteer tester
Avatar

Send message
Joined: 8 Jan 01
Posts: 1179
Credit: 583,438
RAC: 319
United States
Message 1829233 - Posted: 9 Nov 2016, 3:38:36 UTC

Berkeley SETI turns Australian telescope on nearest exoplanet to Earth

Breakthrough Listen, the UC Berkeley-led 10-year, $100 million search for intelligent life beyond Earth, inaugurated its observations with the Parkes Radio Telescope in Australia by homing in on our nearest extrasolar planet, Proxima b, the main destination for a sister project called Breakthrough Starshot.


--- snip ---

After 14 days of commissioning and test observations, first light for Breakthrough Listen at Parkes was achieved on Nov. 7 with an observation of a newly discovered Earth-size planet orbiting the star nearest to Earth, Proxima Centauri. A red dwarf star 4.3 light-years from Earth, Proxima Centauri is now known to have a planet, designated Proxima b, within its habitable zone, the region where water could exist in liquid form on the planet’s surface.


ID: 1829233 · Report as offensive     Reply Quote
Profile LynnProject Donor
Volunteer tester
Avatar

Send message
Joined: 20 Nov 00
Posts: 11831
Credit: 31,840,551
RAC: 31,852
United States
Message 1832519 - Posted: 26 Nov 2016, 1:15:01 UTC - in response to Message 1829233.  

http://www.universetoday.com/132102/what-if-we-do-find-aliens/

Video with link.

What If We Do Find Aliens?


We’ve covered the Fermi Paradox many times over several articles on Universe Today. This is the idea that the Universe is huge, and old, and the ingredients of life are everywhere. Life could and should have have appeared many times across the galaxy, but it’s really strange that we haven’t found any evidence for them yet.
ET Phone Home
ID: 1832519 · Report as offensive     Reply Quote
Profile Gordon Lowe
Volunteer moderator
Avatar

Send message
Joined: 5 Nov 00
Posts: 9786
Credit: 5,165,702
RAC: 2,650
United States
Message 1848436 - Posted: 13 Feb 2017, 1:52:00 UTC - in response to Message 1832519.  

http://www.universetoday.com/132102/what-if-we-do-find-aliens/




From the article:
the next generation of space and ground-based telescopes will let us directly image the atmospheres of extrasolar planets.
I find that in itself mind-boggling.
The mind is a weird and mysterious place
ID: 1848436 · Report as offensive     Reply Quote
John D AnthonyProject Donor

Send message
Joined: 4 Sep 15
Posts: 175
Credit: 384,498
RAC: 546
United States
Message 1848575 - Posted: 14 Feb 2017, 0:08:13 UTC - in response to Message 1848436.  

Your comment led to an interesting chain of thought and another possible answer to the Fermi Paradox.
Given that not long ago we weren't certain that there even are planets around other stars and that now, as you say, we will soon be directly imaging the atmospheres of other planets, let's simply extrapolate that progress into the future.
What if we - and presumably other civilizations - develop the capacity to directly image other worlds as clearly and closely as our own satellites in Earth orbit do for us? If we could watch life on other worlds - it's environment, evolution, technological development - would we still consider the expense and hazards of interstellar travel justified?
Maybe no one's visiting because they don't need to.
ID: 1848575 · Report as offensive     Reply Quote
Nick: ID 666
Volunteer tester

Send message
Joined: 18 May 99
Posts: 11217
Credit: 31,472,098
RAC: 1,740
United Kingdom
Message 1862614 - Posted: 21 Apr 2017, 4:06:27 UTC

No encounters: most ambitious alien search to date draws a blank
Astronomers who have been listening for signals from alien civilisations in the most intensive hunt for extraterrestrials yet have found no evidence of life in its first year in operation.

The Breakthrough Listen project began to eavesdrop on the universe with the Green Bank observatory in West Virginia in January last year, but the most intelligent transmissions the telescope has picked up so far appear to be from satellites or mobile phones and other earthly devices.

Data released by the project on Thursday revealed eleven of the most promising signals detected, but after close inspection scientists concluded that the radiowaves probably came from humans rather than other intelligent lifeforms.

“These are the signals that look most like what we’d expect to see from a distant technology, but when we looked at them closely were were able to determine that it’s most likely they’re interference,” said Andrew Siemion, the director of the Berkeley Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence centre.

Name change to reflect my BOINC ID number
ID: 1862614 · Report as offensive     Reply Quote
Profile LynnProject Donor
Volunteer tester
Avatar

Send message
Joined: 20 Nov 00
Posts: 11831
Credit: 31,840,551
RAC: 31,852
United States
Message 1863562 - Posted: 25 Apr 2017, 0:30:53 UTC - in response to Message 1862614.  


No aliens yet for $100 million ET hunt


A $100 million search for intelligent aliens has come up with some intriguing leads but has revealed no evidence of E.T. so far.

Observations of nearly 700 stars by the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in West Virginia revealed no compelling signs of alien civilizations, representatives of the Breakthrough Listen project, which led the observations for the E.T. search, announced April 20.

Team members also unveiled the GBT's 11 "most significant" observed events but stressed that these hits were probably caused by human technology. 13 Ways to Hunt Intelligent Aliens


"We were able to determine that they were most likely due to radio frequency interference," Andrew Siemion, director of the University of California, Berkeley's SETI (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) Research Center, said Thursday during a presentation at the Breakthrough Discuss conference.

The new results are just the beginning for Breakthrough Listen , which billionaire entrepreneur Yuri Milner and a group of scientists, including Stephen Hawking, announced in July 2015. Over the next decade, the ambitious project aims to search the 1 million stars closest to the sun, the 100 galaxies closest to our own Milky Way, and the galactic plane for possible signals of intelligent extraterrestrial life.

Breakthrough Listen scientists are starting with an initial target list of 1,709 stars, which the team is observing with three telescopes: the 330-foot GBT radio dish, the 210-foot-wide Parkes radio telescope in Australia and the Automated Planet Finder, a 7.9-foot optical telescope at the Lick Observatory in California.

"This sample of stars is designed to be what we call 'spectral type complete' — it samples stars of every spectral type," Siemion said. "We want to look at as many different types of stars as possible, to leave ourselves open to any possibility that life might emerge [around] one of these stars."

The newly announced results, which the team submitted to The Astrophysical Journal on Thursday, are based on GBT data for 692 of those 1,709 stars. The telescope made about 5,000 individual 5-minute observations, racking up a total of 400 observing hours, Siemion said.

Those observations targeted a band of frequencies that includes the "water hole," a quiet part of the radio spectrum that SETI scientists have long speculated would be a good window for interstellar communication. The water hole lies between the emission band of hydroxyl molecules (OH) and that of hydrogen. Together, hydroxyl and hydrogen form water — hence the name.

"These results represent the most comprehensive and fundamental test of the water-hole hypothesis that's ever been conducted for nearby stars," Siemion said. "This is a classic idea in the search for extraterrestrial intelligence that's been with us for more than four decades."

Breakthrough Listen is part of the Breakthrough Initiatives, which Milner founded in 2015 to look for evidence of life beyond Earth and help spur space exploration. Another program under this umbrella is Breakthrough Starshot , which aims to develop a system that can blast tiny, sail-equipped nanoprobes to other star systems at 20 percent the speed of light using powerful lasers.
ET Phone Home
ID: 1863562 · Report as offensive     Reply Quote
Profile LynnProject Donor
Volunteer tester
Avatar

Send message
Joined: 20 Nov 00
Posts: 11831
Credit: 31,840,551
RAC: 31,852
United States
Message 1889678 - Posted: 14 Sep 2017, 2:48:00 UTC - in response to Message 1863562.  


Next year, scientists will send messages to search for aliens


For the last half-century or so, astronomers around the world have been scanning the cosmos with massive radio telescopes in hopes of finding some sign of intelligent life. This network of alien-hunters comprises the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI), but despite all their efforts, the interstellar radio waves have remained quiet. One might even say too quiet.
ET Phone Home
ID: 1889678 · Report as offensive     Reply Quote
Previous · 1 . . . 5 · 6 · 7 · 8

Message boards : SETI@home Science : SETI@home in the News


 
©2017 University of California
 
SETI@home and Astropulse are funded by grants from the National Science Foundation, NASA, and donations from SETI@home volunteers. AstroPulse is funded in part by the NSF through grant AST-0307956.