32 bit or 64 bit, that is the question?


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Message boards : Number crunching : 32 bit or 64 bit, that is the question?

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Profile Johnney Guinness
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Message 646645 - Posted: 22 Sep 2007, 17:29:49 UTC
Last modified: 22 Sep 2007, 17:36:00 UTC

Hi folks,
I just have a simple question.

Where do i go to find out if my PC is 32 bit or 64 bit?

My PC; GenuineIntel
Intel(R) Core(TM)2 CPU 6400 @ 2.13GHz [x86 Family 6 Model 15 Stepping 6]


My other PC; AuthenticAMD
mobile AMD Athlon(tm) XP 1500+ [x86 Family 6 Model 8 Stepping 0]

Here is another one; GenuineIntel
Intel(R) Pentium(R) 4 CPU 3.00GHz

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Message 646647 - Posted: 22 Sep 2007, 17:38:24 UTC
Last modified: 22 Sep 2007, 17:42:11 UTC

You need to know the details of your CPU to tell for sure, but here's some info to get started with:

x86-64 Capability

<edit> LOL... That helps, so the Intel Core, yes, and the AMD, no (they're easy though, if it's not an A64 it's no). The P4 would depend on it stepping.

HTH,

Alinator

Profile Johnney Guinness
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Message 646657 - Posted: 22 Sep 2007, 17:57:12 UTC

But is there a simple way to find out on any PC?

Like for instance; Windows start menu-> Control panel-> System -> something next?

Is there a simple way to find if a PC is 64 or 32 bit?
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Message 646671 - Posted: 22 Sep 2007, 18:36:52 UTC - in response to Message 646657.

Is there a simple way to find if a PC is 64 or 32 bit?

Not sure how general this is, but if you find and download the popular application cpu-z from www.cpuid.com, and execute it, you'll find on the cpu tab a list of the special capabilities the program detects on your cpu.

For example, for my Core 2 Quad Q6600, this field reads:

MMX, SSE, SSE2, SSE3, SSSE3, EM64T

of which the EM64T is the one that denotes it supports the 64-bit extension to the x86 instruction set.

I assume it detects this on AMD parts as well, though it may use a different name. I'll bet it includes "64" though.

cpu-z is popular in this community. For example, it is a recommended way to determine processor capability in order to choose the right version of optimized science aps.

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Message 646690 - Posted: 22 Sep 2007, 19:35:22 UTC

I downloaded that cpu-z thing.

Here is my PC



So i am also assuming that my PC is 64 bit from looking at that picture because i also have the "EM64T" in there.

So really the short answer to my question is that there is no simple way that your average idiot like me can know how many "Bits" my computer is just by quickly checking something on his computer.

So what i am really getting at here is when i want to decide what opp app i need for my computer, the only way for finding out how many bits i have is to download that cpu-z thing! Is that the case?

John.
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Message 646697 - Posted: 22 Sep 2007, 19:58:34 UTC - in response to Message 646690.

I downloaded that cpu-z thing.

Here is my PC



So i am also assuming that my PC is 64 bit from looking at that picture because i also have the "EM64T" in there.
Yes, you have a Core 2 Duo E6400. That CPU definitely supports the 64-bit extension. I don't know if there is an easier way to tell your CPU capabilities.

Just because your CPU is capable does not mean your system is, I think. I believe you would need to be running a 64-bit Windows OS in order to run a 64-bit Windows Science Ap. That, I suspect, would show up on the General tab of the System entry in Control panel in a Windows system. I can't check it, because I have only 32-bit Windows XP OS on my 64-bit capable systems.

I've already said too much, and should bow out hoping someone who has more direct knowledge for your specific need can help, possibly by correcting my errors.

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Message 646709 - Posted: 22 Sep 2007, 20:32:40 UTC - in response to Message 646697.

I downloaded that cpu-z thing.

Here is my PC



So i am also assuming that my PC is 64 bit from looking at that picture because i also have the "EM64T" in there.
Yes, you have a Core 2 Duo E6400. That CPU definitely supports the 64-bit extension. I don't know if there is an easier way to tell your CPU capabilities.

Just because your CPU is capable does not mean your system is, I think. I believe you would need to be running a 64-bit Windows OS in order to run a 64-bit Windows Science Ap. That, I suspect, would show up on the General tab of the System entry in Control panel in a Windows system. I can't check it, because I have only 32-bit Windows XP OS on my 64-bit capable systems.

I've already said too much, and should bow out hoping someone who has more direct knowledge for your specific need can help, possibly by correcting my errors.

Ok this calls for Me to chip in, As I run a 64bit OS, XP x64 and to run a 64 bit seti app and 64bit Boinc Client software You'd need a 64 bit OS, In this case since You may be using Windows, Then XP x64 or Vista x64 are what You'd need. Note that If you do want to use a 64 bit Windows OS, No 8 bit programs or 16 bit programs are supported by Windows Itself, There are ways around this, But I don't know anything about that and so I can't be of any help there. :D

Good Luck.
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Message 646768 - Posted: 22 Sep 2007, 22:54:27 UTC

So to sum up this chat in a few words.

There is no simple "rule of thumb" that someone can use to pick the correct opp app.

You are either a computer wizz or you are not. And if you are not a wizz, then forget opp apps!

Are those statments correct!
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Message 646784 - Posted: 22 Sep 2007, 23:10:56 UTC - in response to Message 646768.

So to sum up this chat in a few words.

There is no simple "rule of thumb" that someone can use to pick the correct opp app.

You are either a computer wizz or you are not. And if you are not a wizz, then forget opp apps!

Are those statments correct!


Not really...you're making a mountain out of a molehill.

MOST computers out there are still 32-bit systems. A 64-bit computer will run a 32-bit app with no problems. When in doubt, use the 32-bit optimized app.

I think I recall in another thread that they said the 64-bit optimized app actually ran about 1% slower than the 32-bit one (but I could be wrong on that). Regardless, the difference in speed is minimal to use the 32-bit app instead of the 64-bit one.

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Message 646876 - Posted: 23 Sep 2007, 1:26:12 UTC
Last modified: 23 Sep 2007, 1:28:02 UTC

OK so!

I just want to thank everyone that helped me with this problem.

Alinator, archae86, the Batman and RandyC

You have all been very helpful. Thank you!
SETI@home would be nothing without the people that help out here. And i am greatful for that.

It has straightened out a few things for me.

John

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Message boards : Number crunching : 32 bit or 64 bit, that is the question?

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