what is the hottest (temperature) element/celestial body ever hypothesized?

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Profile MeltWreckage
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Message 577372 - Posted: 28 May 2007, 14:23:33 UTC
Last modified: 28 May 2007, 14:24:08 UTC

How high can temperatures naturally rise? I was watching a documentary about UFOs, and they were discussing fragments of a ship that had allegedly crashed in Roswell. The narrater noted that there was evidence that the fragments had been subjected to temperatures that far exceeded our own Sun. Whether you believe any of that story is irrelevant - what I'm asking is: what's hotter than the Sun/stars? What is the temperature of, for example, the center of a Black Hole?


that would have worked if you hadn't stopped me

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Message 577448 - Posted: 28 May 2007, 16:33:16 UTC - in response to Message 577372.
Last modified: 28 May 2007, 16:36:23 UTC

How high can temperatures naturally rise? I was watching a documentary about UFOs, and they were discussing fragments of a ship that had allegedly crashed in Roswell. The narrater noted that there was evidence that the fragments had been subjected to temperatures that far exceeded our own Sun. Whether you believe any of that story is irrelevant - what I'm asking is: what's hotter than the Sun/stars? What is the temperature of, for example, the center of a Black Hole?


from Sun wiki

The Sun has a spectral class of G2V. G2 implies that it has a surface temperature of approximately 5,500 K (or approximately 9,600 degrees Fahrenheit / 5,315 Celsius)


from Lightning wiki

It can reach temperatures approaching 28,000 °C (50,000 °F), hot enough to fuse soil or sand into glass channels.


So yes, whether it was an extraterrestrial craft, experimental aircraft or project mogul balloon, it may indeed have experienced temperatures many times that of the surface of the sun. (from a lightning strike)

..As to black holes... well i dunno :D

"It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent that survives. It is the one that is the most adaptable to change."
Charles Darwin

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Message 578619 - Posted: 30 May 2007, 19:14:45 UTC

Back in the sixties (or whenever we blew up our last- or one of our later- hydrogen bomb(s)) Life Magazine said ..Five Times Hotter Than the Center of the Sun" and said that the temperature of (the center?) of that fireball was about 100,000,000 degrees Fahrenheit (about 55,555,555C). So the center of the Sun is much hotter than its surface. I even recently read (in the past decade or so) the the center of the Earth might be hotter than the surface of the Sun.


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Profile KD [SETI.USA]
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Message 578796 - Posted: 30 May 2007, 23:28:52 UTC - in response to Message 577372.

what's hotter than the Sun/stars? What is the temperature of, for example, the center of a Black Hole?


The "hottest temperature" (Planck Temperature) that our known universe has experienced, in theory, is about 10^32 Kelvin at the onset of the BB. What the temp was at singularity is unknown since singularity only exists to us as a mathematical construct where all our known laws break down.

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Message 587650 - Posted: 16 Jun 2007, 15:17:07 UTC

Long time no post for me but here's my thoughts on this...

It seems wonderfully strange that we have determined Absolute Zero to be 0 K (–273.15 °C or -459.67 °F), which does not seem all that much colder than the ideal conditions for life when compared to the highest observed temperatures in the universe. Remembering as well that the range of temperatures is so large.

One might say that the conditions required for life are cold, the conditions required for human life are only very, very, very slightly warmer.


Kolch - Crunching for the BOINC@Australia team since July 2004.
Search for your own intelligence...

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Message 587785 - Posted: 16 Jun 2007, 19:28:32 UTC - in response to Message 578619.

Back in the sixties (or whenever we blew up our last- or one of our later- hydrogen bomb(s)) Life Magazine said ..Five Times Hotter Than the Center of the Sun" and said that the temperature of (the center?) of that fireball was about 100,000,000 degrees Fahrenheit (about 55,555,555C). So the center of the Sun is much hotter than its surface. I even recently read (in the past decade or so) the the center of the Earth might be hotter than the surface of the Sun.

Do you recall where you read this?
I read within the past 1-2 months an article in Discover magazine about different theories about the core of the Earth (and layers above it, as well), but I do not think there was any suggestion of the core being much hotter than the surface of the Sun ... ?
Capitalize on this good fortune, one word can bring you round ... changes.

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Message 588241 - Posted: 17 Jun 2007, 19:14:34 UTC

I read that the center of the Earth is about 12,000 degrees Fahrenheit several years ago, but don't know from what source. Possibly it was from "Sky and Telescope". Chances are it was from just one article- and other articles might give different temperatures. My memory is poor but that core might be mostly iron, and maybe solid. Extreme pressure (but not extreme on an astronomical basis) probably changes the properties of superheated metals a whole lot. I would guess that the pressure at the center of Earth might be half the weight of an inch-square column of Earth the radius long, since gravity decreases to zero at the center. But it would be even less than that because the core is denser than the average (5.5 g/cm^3). If it would be 1/3 the weight, I would get 1/3 * 5.5 * 62.3/1728 * 3950 * 63360 or about 16.5 million psi.


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Message 588258 - Posted: 17 Jun 2007, 19:37:42 UTC - in response to Message 587785.
Last modified: 17 Jun 2007, 19:39:57 UTC

Back in the sixties (or whenever we blew up our last- or one of our later- hydrogen bomb(s)) Life Magazine said ..Five Times Hotter Than the Center of the Sun" and said that the temperature of (the center?) of that fireball was about 100,000,000 degrees Fahrenheit (about 55,555,555C). So the center of the Sun is much hotter than its surface. I even recently read (in the past decade or so) the the center of the Earth might be hotter than the surface of the Sun.

Do you recall where you read this?
I read within the past 1-2 months an article in Discover magazine about different theories about the core of the Earth (and layers above it, as well), but I do not think there was any suggestion of the core being much hotter than the surface of the Sun ... ?


Estimates of the temperature of the earth's core are between 5000C and 7000C.

http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasci/env99/env281.htm

The temperature of the photosphere of the sun is about 6000C.

http://www.solarviews.com/eng/sun.htm

The two temperatures are roughly the same.

https://youtu.be/iY57ErBkFFE

#Texit

Don't blame me, I voted for Johnson(L) in 2016.

Truth is dangerous... especially when it challenges those in power.

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Message boards : SETI@home Science : what is the hottest (temperature) element/celestial body ever hypothesized?


 
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