Photography (way off topic)


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Profile Christopher Hauber
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Message 9811 - Posted: 19 Jul 2004, 15:20:31 UTC

I know this forum isn't really meant for this, and that people don't take to kindly to random off-topic posts and such, but it's possible there might be someone here who could help me out with this problem.

I'm taking a black and white photography class and our assignments for our final portfolio are like/dislike (one of each), lights and shadows (2 total), blue (2 total), and shape composition (two total).

The problem is that noone in the class really knows what "blue" is and when we ask the teacher what it is he always gives us an ambiguous response and said that we should look it up [in the dictionary]. I did and emailed him asking him about it because it essentially said blue could mean just about anything except red. He emailed me back saying "if it is blue to you you might be right."

Now if this were color photography it would be easier. It could also be referring largely to the color of the sky since skies don't do very well without a yellow, orange, or even red filter. But filter's aren't required for the class so I'm not sure if that is what he means or if he is more after a particular feeling. In any case I'm running out of time to figure it out.

If anyone knows what it is he is asking for I would appreciate the help.

Thanks,
Chris



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Message 9825 - Posted: 19 Jul 2004, 15:41:26 UTC - in response to Message 9811.

> I know this forum isn't really meant for this, and that people don't take to
> kindly to random off-topic posts and such, but it's possible there might be
> someone here who could help me out with this problem.
>
> I'm taking a black and white photography class and our assignments for our
> final portfolio are like/dislike (one of each), lights and shadows (2 total),
> blue (2 total), and shape composition (two total).
>
> The problem is that noone in the class really knows what "blue" is and when we
> ask the teacher what it is he always gives us an ambiguous response and said
> that we should look it up [in the dictionary]. I did and emailed him asking


Perhaps he is referring to blue as in a mood not a colour. As in melancholy. Is it possible he's asking you to compose your photographs to portray a feeling of despair, sadness etc. ?




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Message 9831 - Posted: 19 Jul 2004, 15:55:52 UTC - in response to Message 9811.

Some more.

One of the first photographic printing processes used a blue pigment for black and white prints. Don't know what he'd expect from that though? Unless you have to make a print in this style?

Also, maybe the use of a blue filter. Which would give more emphasis to subjects likes skies.

Mood as bfarrant suggests may be the most likely though? B&W has always been an excellent medium for the study of emotions...

Profile Christopher Hauber
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Message 9832 - Posted: 19 Jul 2004, 15:56:08 UTC - in response to Message 9825.

That's what I meant by feeling. And it is possible. I just don't know. I mean, according to the dictionary blue really can mean just about anything except red, and even then you could practically say it is "the absence of blue." It takes so long to develop a print though and there is so little time left in the course, I would like to be more sure of what it is he wants before I spend my time developing it.

> Perhaps he is referring to blue as in a mood not a colour. As in melancholy.
> Is it possible he's asking you to compose your photographs to portray a
> feeling of despair, sadness etc. ?
>

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Message 9839 - Posted: 19 Jul 2004, 16:03:23 UTC - in response to Message 9831.

The coloring of B&W prints is introduced in the next course. And for clarification, a yellow filter to a red filter emphasize skies and clouds in increasing order (red being the most) and are great for bringing out clouds. A blue filter would basically whiten the sky on B&W. My dislike picture actually had a really cool whispy cloud that showed up outstandingly using a yellow filter.

Chris

> Some more.
>
> One of the first photographic printing processes used a blue pigment for black
> and white prints. Don't know what he'd expect from that though? Unless you
> have to make a print in this style?
>
> Also, maybe the use of a blue filter. Which would give more emphasis to
> subjects likes skies.
>
> Mood as bfarrant suggests may be the most likely though? B&W has always
> been an excellent medium for the study of emotions...
>
>
>

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Message 10001 - Posted: 19 Jul 2004, 20:26:03 UTC
Last modified: 19 Jul 2004, 20:31:04 UTC

Chris

There is a process known as blue printing or cyanotypes.

Throw it into google and something should turn up.

Or alternativly http://www.cyanotypes.com/

Even better : http://photography.about.com/library/weekly/aa061801e.htm

Hope it helps

Neil

Profile Christopher Hauber
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Message 10021 - Posted: 19 Jul 2004, 21:31:16 UTC - in response to Message 10001.

Well one thing I do know is that it isn't going to be part of the processing. All of the assignments are composition based. Since this is only the first level of photography, the developing and post processing is kept fairly simple and (with spot toning being the only type of post editing).

But you've pointed me in a pretty cool direction and I may still yet find my answer. If anyone else has an idea or knows what he's asking for, then go ahead and post it. I'm going to be leaving work soon to work on some other prints so I probably won't see anymore replies until late tonight or tomorrow. Thanks to everyone who has helped so far.

Chris


> Chris
>
> There is a process known as blue printing or cyanotypes.
>
> Throw it into google and something should turn up.
>
> Or alternativly http://www.cyanotypes.com/
>
> Even better : http://photography.about.com/library/weekly/aa061801e.htm
>
> Hope it helps
>
> Neil
>
>

Message boards : Number crunching : Photography (way off topic)

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